Metabolite profiling and cardiovascular event risk: a prospective study of 3 population-based cohorts.

Circulation
Authors
Keywords
Abstract

BACKGROUND: High-throughput profiling of circulating metabolites may improve cardiovascular risk prediction over established risk factors.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We applied quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics to identify the biomarkers for incident cardiovascular disease during long-term follow-up. Biomarker discovery was conducted in the National Finnish FINRISK study (n=7256; 800 events). Replication and incremental risk prediction was assessed in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) study (n=2622; 573 events) and British Women's Health and Heart Study (n=3563; 368 events). In targeted analyses of 68 lipids and metabolites, 33 measures were associated with incident cardiovascular events at P

CONCLUSIONS: Metabolite profiling in large prospective cohorts identified phenylalanine, monounsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids as biomarkers for cardiovascular risk. This study substantiates the value of high-throughput metabolomics for biomarker discovery and improved risk assessment.

Year of Publication
2015
Journal
Circulation
Volume
131
Issue
9
Pages
774-85
Date Published
2015 Mar 03
ISSN
1524-4539
URL
DOI
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.013116
PubMed ID
25573147
PubMed Central ID
PMC4351161
Links
Grant list
R01 DK 081572 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
PG/13/66/30442 / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
CS/13/1/30327 / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
WT082464AIA / Wellcome Trust / United Kingdom
PG/08/103/26133 / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
R01 DK081572 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC025195 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098280 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
PG/12/29/29497 / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
G1000427 / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
N01HC25195 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL98280 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MC_UU_12013/5 / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
SP/07/001/23603 / British Heart Foundation / United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/8 / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom