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Bipolar Disord DOI:10.1111/bdi.12143

Pilot investigation of isradipine in the treatment of bipolar depression motivated by genome-wide association.

Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsOstacher, MJ, Iosifescu, DV, Hay, A, Blumenthal, SR, Sklar, P, Perlis, RH
JournalBipolar Disord
Volume16
Issue2
Pages199-203
Date Published2014 Mar
ISSN1399-5618
KeywordsAdult, Bipolar Disorder, Calcium Channel Blockers, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Isradipine, Male, Middle Aged, Pilot Projects, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Motivated by genetic association data implicating L-type calcium channels in bipolar disorder liability, we sought to estimate the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of isradipine in the adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression.

METHODS: A total of 12 patients with bipolar I or II depression entered this pilot, proof-of-concept eight-week investigation and 10 returned for at least one post-baseline visit. They were initiated on isradipine at 2.5 mg and titrated up to 10 mg daily, with blinded assessments of depression using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) as well as adverse effects.

RESULTS: Among the 10 patients, three had bipolar II disorder; all but two reported current episode duration longer than six months. In all, four of 10 completed the study; no significant adverse events were observed, although one subject discontinued treatment per protocol because of possible hypomanic symptoms which had resolved prior to study visit. In a mixed-effects model, mean improvement in depression severity, assessed by MADRS, was 2.1 (standard error = 0.36) points/week (p 

CONCLUSIONS: Isradipine merits further investigation for the treatment of bipolar depression. This preliminary trial illustrates the potential utility of genetic investigation in identifying psychiatric treatment targets.

DOI10.1111/bdi.12143
Pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24372835?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalBipolar Disord
PubMed ID24372835