Scientific Publications

Connecting synthetic chemistry decisions to cell and genome biology using small-molecule phenotypic profiling.

Publication TypeJournal Article
AuthorsWagner, BK, and Clemons PA
AbstractDiscovering small-molecule modulators for thousands of gene products requires multiple stages of biological testing, specificity evaluation, and chemical optimization. Many cellular profiling methods, including cellular sensitivity, gene expression, and cellular imaging, have emerged as methods to assess the functional consequences of biological perturbations. Cellular profiling methods applied to small-molecule science provide opportunities to use complex phenotypic information to prioritize and optimize small-molecule structures simultaneously against multiple biological endpoints. As throughput increases and cost decreases for such technologies, we see an emerging paradigm of using more information earlier in probe-discovery and drug-discovery efforts. Moreover, increasing access to public datasets makes possible the construction of 'virtual' profiles of small-molecule performance, even when multiplexed measurements were not performed or when multidimensional profiling was not the original intent. We review some key conceptual advances in small-molecule phenotypic profiling, emphasizing connections to other information, such as protein-binding measurements, genetic perturbations, and cell states. We argue that to maximally leverage these measurements in probe-discovery and drug-discovery requires a fundamental connection to synthetic chemistry, allowing the consequences of synthetic decisions to be described in terms of changes in small-molecule profiles. Mining such data in the context of chemical structure and synthesis strategies can inform decisions about chemistry procurement and library development, leading to optimal small-molecule screening collections.
Year of Publication2009
JournalCurrent opinion in chemical biology
Volume13
Issue5-6
Pages539-48
Date Published (YYYY/MM/DD)2009/12/01
ISSN Number1367-5931
DOI10.1016/j.cbpa.2009.09.018
PubMedhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19825513?dopt=Abstract