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Created 2014-11-25 01:08:55 | Updated 2014-11-25 03:15:46 | Tags: intro
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If this is your first rodeo, you're probably asking yourself:

  • What can GATK do for me? Identify variants in a bunch of sample sequences, with great sensitivity and specificity.

  • How do I get GATK to do that? You run the recommended Best Practices steps, one by one, from start to finish, as described in the Best Practices documentation.

  • No but really, how do I know what to do? For each step in the Best Practices, there is a tutorial that details how to run the tools involved, with example commands. The idea is to daisy-chain all thosee tutorials in the order that they're referenced in the Best Practices doc into a pipeline.

  • Oh, you mean I can just copy/paste all the tutorial commands as they are? Not quite, because there are a few things that need to be tweaked. For example, the tutorials use the -L/--intervals argument to restrict analysis for demo purposes, but depending on your data and experimental design, you may need to remove it (e.g. for WGS) or adapt it (for WEx). Hopefully it's explained clearly enough in the tutorials.

  • Why don't you just provide one script that runs all the tools? It's really hard to build and maintain a one-size-fits-all pipeline solution. Really really hard. And not nearly as much fun as developing new analysis methods. We do provide a pipelining program called Queue that has the advantage of understanding GATK argument syntax natively, but you still have to actually write scripts yourself in Scala to use it. Sorry. Maybe one day we will be able to offer GATK analysis on the Cloud. But not today.

  • What if I want to know what a command line argument does or change a parameter? First, check out the basic GATK command syntax FAQ if it's your first time using GATK, then consult the relevant Tool Documentation page. Keep in mind that some arguments are "engine parameters" that are shared by many tools, and are listed in a separate document. Also, you can always use the search box to find an argument description really quickly.

  • The documentation seems chaotic. Is there any logic to how it's organized? Sort of. (And, ouch. Tough crowd.) The main category names should be obvious enough (if not, see the "Documentation Categories" tab). Within categories, everything is just in alphabetical order. In future, we're going to try to provide more use-case based structure, but for now this is what we have. The best way to find practical information is to either go from the Best Practices doc (which provide links to all FAQs, method articles and tutorials directly related to a given step), or use the search box and search-by-tag functions (see the "Search tab"). Be sure to also check out the Presentations section, which provides workshop materials and videos that explain a lot of the motivation and methods behind the Best Practices.

  • Does GATK include other tools beside the ones in the Best Practices? Oh sure, there's a whole bunch of them, all listed in the Tool Documentation section, categorized by type of analysis. But be aware that anything that's not part of the Best Practices is most likely either a tool that was written for a one-off analysis years ago, an experimental feature that we're still not sure is actually useful, or an accessory utility that can be used in many different ways and takes expert inside knowledge to use properly. All these may be buggy, insufficiently documented, or both. We provide support for them as well as humanly possible but ultimately, you use them at your own risk.

  • Why do the answers to these questions keep getting longer and longer? I don't know what you're talking about.

  • What else should I know before I start? You should probably browse the titles of the Frequently Asked Questions -- there will be at least a handful you'll want to read, but it's hard for us to predict which ones.


Created 2012-12-18 21:35:34 | Updated 2013-01-26 05:10:36 | Tags: official intro queue parallelism performance scatter-gather multithreading nct nt
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This document explains the concepts involved and how they are applied within the GATK (and Queue where applicable). For specific configuration recommendations, see the companion document on parallelizing GATK tools.

1. Introducing the concept of parallelism

Parallelism is a way to make a program finish faster by performing several operations in parallel, rather than sequentially (i.e. waiting for each operation to finish before starting the next one).

Imagine you need to cook rice for sixty-four people, but your rice cooker can only make enough rice for four people at a time. If you have to cook all the batches of rice sequentially, it's going to take all night. But if you have eight rice cookers that you can use in parallel, you can finish up to eight times faster.

This is a very simple idea but it has a key requirement: you have to be able to break down the job into smaller tasks that can be done independently. It's easy enough to divide portions of rice because rice itself is a collection of discrete units. In contrast, let's look at a case where you can't make that kind of division: it takes one pregnant woman nine months to grow a baby, but you can't do it in one month by having nine women share the work.

The good news is that most GATK runs are more like rice than like babies. Because GATK tools are built to use the Map/Reduce method (see doc for details), most GATK runs essentially consist of a series of many small independent operations that can be parallelized.

A quick warning about tradeoffs

Parallelism is a great way to speed up processing on large amounts of data, but it has "overhead" costs. Without getting too technical at this point, let's just say that parallelized jobs need to be managed, you have to set aside memory for them, regulate file access, collect results and so on. So it's important to balance the costs against the benefits, and avoid dividing the overall work into too many small jobs.

Going back to the introductory example, you wouldn't want to use a million tiny rice cookers that each boil a single grain of rice. They would take way too much space on your countertop, and the time it would take to distribute each grain then collect it when it's cooked would negate any benefits from parallelizing in the first place.

Parallel computing in practice (sort of)

OK, parallelism sounds great (despite the tradeoffs caveat), but how do we get from cooking rice to executing programs? What actually happens in the computer?

Consider that when you run a program like the GATK, you're just telling the computer to execute a set of instructions.

Let's say we have a text file and we want to count the number of lines in it. The set of instructions to do this can be as simple as:

  • open the file, count the number of lines in the file, tell us the number, close the file

Note that tell us the number can mean writing it to the console, or storing it somewhere for use later on.

Now let's say we want to know the number of words on each line. The set of instructions would be:

  • open the file, read the first line, count the number of words, tell us the number, read the second line, count the number of words, tell us the number, read the third line, count the number of words, tell us the number

And so on until we've read all the lines, and finally we can close the file. It's pretty straightforward, but if our file has a lot of lines, it will take a long time, and it will probably not use all the computing power we have available.

So to parallelize this program and save time, we just cut up this set of instructions into separate subsets like this:

  • open the file, index the lines

  • read the first line, count the number of words, tell us the number

  • read the second line, count the number of words, tell us the number
  • read the third line, count the number of words, tell us the number
  • [repeat for all lines]

  • collect final results and close the file

Here, the read the Nth line steps can be performed in parallel, because they are all independent operations.

You'll notice that we added a step, index the lines. That's a little bit of peliminary work that allows us to perform the read the Nth line steps in parallel (or in any order we want) because it tells us how many lines there are and where to find each one within the file. It makes the whole process much more efficient. As you may know, the GATK requires index files for the main data files (reference, BAMs and VCFs); the reason is essentially to have that indexing step already done.

Anyway, that's the general principle: you transform your linear set of instructions into several subsets of instructions. There's usually one subset that has to be run first and one that has to be run last, but all the subsets in the middle can be run at the same time (in parallel) or in whatever order you want.

2. Parallelizing the GATK

There are three different modes of parallelism offered by the GATK, and to really understand the difference you first need to understand what are the different levels of computing that are involved.

A quick word about levels of computing

By levels of computing, we mean the computing units in terms of hardware: the core, the machine (or CPU) and the cluster.

  • Core: the level below the machine. On your laptop or desktop, the CPU (central processing unit, or processor) contains one or more cores. If you have a recent machine, your CPU probably has at least two cores, and is therefore called dual-core. If it has four, it's a quad-core, and so on. High-end consumer machines like the latest Mac Pro have up to twelve-core CPUs (which should be called dodeca-core if we follow the Latin terminology) but the CPUs on some professional-grade machines can have tens or hundreds of cores.

  • Machine: the middle of the scale. For most of us, the machine is the laptop or desktop computer. Really we should refer to the CPU specifically, since that's the relevant part that does the processing, but the most common usage is to say machine. Except if the machine is part of a cluster, in which case it's called a node.

  • Cluster: the level above the machine. This is a high-performance computing structure made of a bunch of machines (usually called nodes) networked together. If you have access to a cluster, chances are it either belongs to your institution, or your company is renting time on it. A cluster can also be called a server farm or a load-sharing facility.

Parallelism can be applied at all three of these levels, but in different ways of course, and under different names. Parallelism takes the name of multi-threading at the core and machine levels, and scatter-gather at the cluster level.

Multi-threading

In computing, a thread of execution is a set of instructions that the program issues to the processor to get work done. In single-threading mode, a program only sends a single thread at a time to the processor and waits for it to be finished before sending another one. In multi-threading mode, the program may send several threads to the processor at the same time.

Not making sense? Let's go back to our earlier example, in which we wanted to count the number of words in each line of our text document. Hopefully it is clear that the first version of our little program (one long set of sequential instructions) is what you would run in single-threaded mode. And the second version (several subsets of instructions) is what you would run in multi-threaded mode, with each subset forming a separate thread. You would send out the first thread, which performs the preliminary work; then once it's done you would send the "middle" threads, which can be run in parallel; then finally once they're all done you would send out the final thread to clean up and collect final results.

If you're still having a hard time visualizing what the different threads are like, just imagine that you're doing cross-stitching. If you're a regular human, you're working with just one hand. You're pulling a needle and thread (a single thread!) through the canvas, making one stitch after another, one row after another. Now try to imagine an octopus doing cross-stitching. He can make several rows of stitches at the same time using a different needle and thread for each. Multi-threading in computers is surprisingly similar to that.

Hey, if you have a better example, let us know in the forum and we'll use that instead.

Alright, now that you understand the idea of multithreading, let's get practical: how do we do get the GATK to use multi-threading?

There are two options for multi-threading with the GATK, controlled by the arguments -nt and -nct, respectively. They can be combined, since they act at different levels of computing:

  • -nt / --num_threads controls the number of data threads sent to the processor (acting at the machine level)

  • -nct / --num_cpu_threads_per_data_thread controls the number of CPU threads allocated to each data thread (acting at the core level).

Not all GATK tools can use these options due to the nature of the analyses that they perform and how they traverse the data. Even in the case of tools that are used sequentially to perform a multi-step process, the individual tools may not support the same options. For example, at time of writing (Dec. 2012), of the tools involved in local realignment around indels, RealignerTargetCreator supports -nt but not -nct, while IndelRealigner does not support either of these options.

In addition, there are some important technical details that affect how these options can be used with optimal results. Those are explained along with specific recommendations for the main GATK tools in a companion document on parallelizing the GATK.

Scatter-gather

If you Google it, you'll find that the term scatter-gather can refer to a lot of different things, including strategies to get the best price quotes from online vendors, methods to control memory allocation and… an indie-rock band. What all of those things have in common (except possibly the band) is that they involve breaking up a task into smaller, parallelized tasks (scattering) then collecting and integrating the results (gathering). That should sound really familiar to you by now, since it's the general principle of parallel computing.

So yes, "scatter-gather" is really just another way to say we're parallelizing things. OK, but how is it different from multithreading, and why do we need yet another name?

As you know by now, multithreading specifically refers to what happens internally when the program (in our case, the GATK) sends several sets of instructions to the processor to achieve the instructions that you originally gave it in a single command-line. In contrast, the scatter-gather strategy as used by the GATK involves a separate program, called Queue, which generates separate GATK jobs (each with its own command-line) to achieve the instructions given in a so-called Qscript (i.e. a script written for Queue in a programming language called Scala).

At the simplest level, the Qscript can involve a single GATK tool*. In that case Queue will create separate GATK commands that will each run that tool on a portion of the input data (= the scatter step). The results of each run will be stored in temporary files. Then once all the runs are done, Queue will collate all the results into the final output files, as if the tool had been run as a single command (= the gather step).

Note that Queue has additional capabilities, such as managing the use of multiple GATK tools in a dependency-aware manner to run complex pipelines, but that is outside the scope of this article. To learn more about pipelining the GATK with Queue, please see the Queue documentation.

Compare and combine

So you see, scatter-gather is a very different process from multi-threading because the parallelization happens outside of the program itself. The big advantage is that this opens up the upper level of computing: the cluster level. Remember, the GATK program is limited to dispatching threads to the processor of the machine on which it is run – it cannot by itself send threads to a different machine. But Queue can dispatch scattered GATK jobs to different machines in a computing cluster by interfacing with your cluster's job management software.

That being said, multithreading has the great advantage that cores and machines all have access to shared machine memory with very high bandwidth capacity. In contrast, the multiple machines on a network used for scatter-gather are fundamentally limited by network costs.

The good news is that you can combine scatter-gather and multithreading: use Queue to scatter GATK jobs to different nodes on your cluster, then use the GATK's internal multithreading capabilities to parallelize the jobs running on each node.

Going back to the rice-cooking example, it's as if instead of cooking the rice yourself, you hired a catering company to do it for you. The company assigns the work to several people, who each have their own cooking station with multiple rice cookers. Now you can feed a lot more people in the same amount of time! And you don't even have to clean the dishes.


Created 2012-11-21 16:24:06 | Updated 2015-04-26 00:07:35 | Tags: intro dependencies requirements
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1. Operating system

The GATK runs natively on most if not all flavors of UNIX, which includes MacOSX, Linux and BSD. It is possible to get it running on Windows using Cygwin, but we don't provide any support nor instructions for that.

2. Java 7 / 1.7

The GATK is a Java-based program, so you'll need to have Java installed on your machine. The Java version should be at 1.7 (at this time we don't officially support 1.8, and 1.6 no longer works). You can check what version you have by typing java -version at the command line. This article has some more details about what to do if you don't have the right version. Note that at this time we only support the Sun/Oracle Java JDK; OpenJDK is not supported.

4. R dependencies

Some of the GATK tools produce plots using R, so if you want to get the plots you'll need to have R and Rscript installed, as well as several R libraries. Full details can be found in the Tutorial on installing required software.

3. Familiarity with command-line programs

The GATK does not have a Graphical User Interface (GUI). You don't open it by clicking on the .jar file; you have to use the Console (or Terminal) to input commands. If this is all new to you, we recommend you first learn about that and follow some online tutorials before trying to use the GATK. It's not difficult but you'll need to learn some jargon and get used to living without a mouse. Trust us, it's a liberating experience :)


Created 2012-11-05 16:20:38 | Updated 2013-01-14 17:35:25 | Tags: official basic analyst intro parallelism performance walkers map-reduce
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Overview

One of the key challenges of working with next-gen sequence data is that input files are usually very large. We can’t just make the program open the files, load all the data into memory and perform whatever analysis is needed on all of it in one go. It’s just too much work, even for supercomputers.

Instead, we make the program cut the job into smaller tasks that the computer can easily process separately. Then we have it combine the results of each step into the final result.

Map/Reduce

Map/Reduce is the technique we use to achieve this. It consists of three steps formally called filter, map and reduce. Let’s apply it to an example case where we want to find out what is the average depth of coverage in our dataset for a certain region of the genome.

  • filter determines what subset of the data needs to be processed in each task. In our example, the program lists all the reference positions in our region of interest.

  • map applies the function, i.e. performs the analysis on each subset of data. In our example, for each position in the list, the program looks into the BAM file, pulls out the pileup of bases and outputs the depth of coverage at that position.

  • reduce combines the elements in the list of results output by the map function. In our example, the program takes the coverage numbers that were calculated separately for all the reference positions and calculates their average, which is the final result we want.

This may seem trivial for such a simple example, but it is a very powerful method with many advantages. Among other things, it makes it relatively easy to parallelize operations, which makes the tools run much faster on large datasets.

Walkers, filters and traversal types

All the tools in the GATK are built from the ground up to take advantage of this method. That’s why we call them walkers: because they “walk” across the genome, getting things done.

Note that even though it’s not included in the Map/Reduce technique’s name, the filter step is very important. It determines what data get presented to the tool for analysis, selecting only the appropriate data for each task and discarding anything that’s not relevant. This is a key part of the Map/Reduce technique, because that’s what makes each task “bite-sized” enough for the computer to handle easily.

Each tool has filters that are tailored specifically for the type of analysis it performs. The filters rely on traversal engines, which are little programs that are designed to “traverse” the data (i.e. walk through the data) in specific ways.

There are three major types of traversal: Locus Traversal, Read Traversal and Active Region Traversal. In our interval coverage example, the tool’s filter uses the Locus Traversal engine, which walks through the data by locus, i.e. by position along the reference genome. Because of that, the tool is classified as a Locus Walker. Similarly, the Read Traversal engine is used, you’ve guessed it, by Read Walkers.

The GATK engine comes packed with many other ways to walk through the genome and get the job done seamlessly, but those are the ones you’ll encounter most often.

Further reading

A primer on parallelism with the GATK How can I use parallelism to make GATK tools run faster?


Created 2012-10-25 20:40:16 | Updated 2013-09-13 18:04:45 | Tags: official faq basic analyst intro gatk-lite lite
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Please note that GATK-Lite was retired in February 2013 when version 2.4 was released. See the announcement here.


You probably know by now that GATK-Lite is a free-for-everyone and completely open-source version of the GATK (licensed under the original MIT license).

But what's in the box? What can GATK-Lite do -- or rather, what can it not do that the full version (let's call it GATK-Full) can? And what does that mean exactly, in terms of functionality, reliability and power?

To really understand the differences between GATK-Lite and GATK-Full, you need some more information on how the GATK works, and how we work to develop and improve it.

First you need to understand what are the two core components of the GATK: the engine and tools (see picture below).

As explained here, the engine handles all the common work that's related to data access, conversion and traversal, as well as high-performance computing features. The engine is supported by an infrastructure of software libraries. If the GATK was a car, that would be the engine and chassis. What we call the **tools* are attached on top of that, and they provide the various analytical and processing functionalities like variant calling and base or variant recalibration. On your car, that would be headlights, airbags and so on.

Core GATK components

Second is how we work on developing the GATK, and what it means for how improvements are shared (or not) between Lite and Full.

We do all our development work on a single codebase. This means that everything --the engine and all tools-- is on one common workbench. There are not different versions that we work on in parallel -- that would be crazy to manage! That's why the version numbers of GATK-Lite and GATK-Full always match: if the latest GATK-Full version is numbered 2.1-13, then the latest GATK-Lite is also numbered 2.1-13.

The most important consequence of this setup is that when we make improvements to the infrastructure and engine, the same improvements will end up in GATK Lite and in GATK Full. So for the purposes of power, speed and robustness of the GATK that is determined by the engine, there is no difference between them.

For the tools, it's a little more complicated -- but not much. When we "build" the GATK binaries (the .jar files), we put everything from the workbench into the Full build, but we only put a subset into the Lite build. Note that this Lite subset is pretty big -- it contains all the tools that were previously available in GATK 1.x versions, and always will. We also reserve the right to add previews or not-fully-featured versions of the new tools that are in Full, at our discretion, to the Lite build.

So there are two basic types of differences between the tools available in the Lite and Full builds (see picture below).

  1. We have a new tool that performs a brand new function (which wasn't available in GATK 1.x), and we only include it in the Full build.

  2. We have a tool that has some new add-on capabilities (which weren't possible in GATK 1.x); we put the tool in both the Lite and the Full build, but the add-ons are only available in the Full build.

Tools in Lite vs. Full

Reprising the car analogy, GATK-Lite and GATK-Full are like two versions of the same car -- the basic version and the fully-equipped one. They both have the exact same engine, and most of the equipment (tools) is the same -- for example, they both have the same airbag system, and they both have headlights. But there are a few important differences:

  1. The GATK-Full car comes with a GPS (sat-nav for our UK friends), for which the Lite car has no equivalent. You could buy a portable GPS unit from a third-party store for your Lite car, but it might not be as good, and certainly not as convenient, as the Full car's built-in one.

  2. Both cars have windows of course, but the Full car has power windows, while the Lite car doesn't. The Lite windows can open and close, but you have to operate them by hand, which is much slower.

So, to summarize:

The underlying engine is exactly the same in both GATK-Lite and GATK-Full. Most functionalities are available in both builds, performed by the same tools. Some functionalities are available in both builds, but they are performed by different tools, and the tool in the Full build is better. New, cutting-edge functionalities are only available in the Full build, and there is no equivalent in the Lite build.

We hope this clears up some of the confusion surrounding GATK-Lite. If not, please leave a comment and we'll do our best to clarify further!


Created 2012-10-02 19:21:59 | Updated 2013-09-13 17:29:43 | Tags: official fastareference basic analyst intro inputs
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This article describes the steps necessary to prepare your reference file (if it's not one that you got from us). As a complement to this article, see the relevant tutorial.

Why these steps are necessary

The GATK uses two files to access and safety check access to the reference files: a .dict dictionary of the contig names and sizes and a .fai fasta index file to allow efficient random access to the reference bases. You have to generate these files in order to be able to use a Fasta file as reference.

NOTE: Picard and samtools treat spaces in contig names differently. We recommend that you avoid using spaces in contig names.

Creating the fasta sequence dictionary file

We use CreateSequenceDictionary.jar from Picard to create a .dict file from a fasta file.

> java -jar CreateSequenceDictionary.jar R= Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta O= Homo_sapiens_assembly18.dict
[Fri Jun 19 14:09:11 EDT 2009] net.sf.picard.sam.CreateSequenceDictionary R= Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta O= Homo_sapiens_assembly18.dict
[Fri Jun 19 14:09:58 EDT 2009] net.sf.picard.sam.CreateSequenceDictionary done.
Runtime.totalMemory()=2112487424
44.922u 2.308s 0:47.09 100.2%   0+0k 0+0io 2pf+0w

This produces a SAM-style header file describing the contents of our fasta file.

> cat Homo_sapiens_assembly18.dict 
@HD     VN:1.0  SO:unsorted
@SQ     SN:chrM LN:16571        UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:d2ed829b8a1628d16cbeee88e88e39eb
@SQ     SN:chr1 LN:247249719    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:9ebc6df9496613f373e73396d5b3b6b6
@SQ     SN:chr2 LN:242951149    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:b12c7373e3882120332983be99aeb18d
@SQ     SN:chr3 LN:199501827    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:0e48ed7f305877f66e6fd4addbae2b9a
@SQ     SN:chr4 LN:191273063    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:cf37020337904229dca8401907b626c2
@SQ     SN:chr5 LN:180857866    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:031c851664e31b2c17337fd6f9004858
@SQ     SN:chr6 LN:170899992    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:bfe8005c536131276d448ead33f1b583
@SQ     SN:chr7 LN:158821424    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:74239c5ceee3b28f0038123d958114cb
@SQ     SN:chr8 LN:146274826    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:1eb00fe1ce26ce6701d2cd75c35b5ccb
@SQ     SN:chr9 LN:140273252    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:ea244473e525dde0393d353ef94f974b
@SQ     SN:chr10        LN:135374737    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:4ca41bf2d7d33578d2cd7ee9411e1533
@SQ     SN:chr11        LN:134452384    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:425ba5eb6c95b60bafbf2874493a56c3
@SQ     SN:chr12        LN:132349534    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:d17d70060c56b4578fa570117bf19716
@SQ     SN:chr13        LN:114142980    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:c4f3084a20380a373bbbdb9ae30da587
@SQ     SN:chr14        LN:106368585    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:c1ff5d44683831e9c7c1db23f93fbb45
@SQ     SN:chr15        LN:100338915    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:5cd9622c459fe0a276b27f6ac06116d8
@SQ     SN:chr16        LN:88827254     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:3e81884229e8dc6b7f258169ec8da246
@SQ     SN:chr17        LN:78774742     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:2a5c95ed99c5298bb107f313c7044588
@SQ     SN:chr18        LN:76117153     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:3d11df432bcdc1407835d5ef2ce62634
@SQ     SN:chr19        LN:63811651     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:2f1a59077cfad51df907ac25723bff28
@SQ     SN:chr20        LN:62435964     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:f126cdf8a6e0c7f379d618ff66beb2da
@SQ     SN:chr21        LN:46944323     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:f1b74b7f9f4cdbaeb6832ee86cb426c6
@SQ     SN:chr22        LN:49691432     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:2041e6a0c914b48dd537922cca63acb8
@SQ     SN:chrX LN:154913754    UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:d7e626c80ad172a4d7c95aadb94d9040
@SQ     SN:chrY LN:57772954     UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:62f69d0e82a12af74bad85e2e4a8bd91
@SQ     SN:chr1_random  LN:1663265      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:cc05cb1554258add2eb62e88c0746394
@SQ     SN:chr2_random  LN:185571       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:18ceab9e4667a25c8a1f67869a4356ea
@SQ     SN:chr3_random  LN:749256       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:9cc571e918ac18afa0b2053262cadab6
@SQ     SN:chr4_random  LN:842648       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:9cab2949ccf26ee0f69a875412c93740
@SQ     SN:chr5_random  LN:143687       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:05926bdbff978d4a0906862eb3f773d0
@SQ     SN:chr6_random  LN:1875562      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:d62eb2919ba7b9c1d382c011c5218094
@SQ     SN:chr7_random  LN:549659       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:28ebfb89c858edbc4d71ff3f83d52231
@SQ     SN:chr8_random  LN:943810       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:0ed5b088d843d6f6e6b181465b9e82ed
@SQ     SN:chr9_random  LN:1146434      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:1e3d2d2f141f0550fa28a8d0ed3fd1cf
@SQ     SN:chr10_random LN:113275       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:50be2d2c6720dabeff497ffb53189daa
@SQ     SN:chr11_random LN:215294       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:bfc93adc30c621d5c83eee3f0d841624
@SQ     SN:chr13_random LN:186858       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:563531689f3dbd691331fd6c5730a88b
@SQ     SN:chr15_random LN:784346       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:bf885e99940d2d439d83eba791804a48
@SQ     SN:chr16_random LN:105485       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:dd06ea813a80b59d9c626b31faf6ae7f
@SQ     SN:chr17_random LN:2617613      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:34d5e2005dffdfaaced1d34f60ed8fc2
@SQ     SN:chr18_random LN:4262 UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:f3814841f1939d3ca19072d9e89f3fd7
@SQ     SN:chr19_random LN:301858       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:420ce95da035386cc8c63094288c49e2
@SQ     SN:chr21_random LN:1679693      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:a7252115bfe5bb5525f34d039eecd096
@SQ     SN:chr22_random LN:257318       UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:4f2d259b82f7647d3b668063cf18378b
@SQ     SN:chrX_random  LN:1719168      UR:file:/humgen/gsa-scr1/depristo/dev/GenomeAnalysisTK/trunk/Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta      M5:f4d71e0758986c15e5455bf3e14e5d6f

Creating the fasta index file

We use the faidx command in samtools to prepare the fasta index file. This file describes byte offsets in the fasta file for each contig, allowing us to compute exactly where a particular reference base at contig:pos is in the fasta file.

> samtools faidx Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta 
108.446u 3.384s 2:44.61 67.9%   0+0k 0+0io 0pf+0w

This produces a text file with one record per line for each of the fasta contigs. Each record is of the: contig, size, location, basesPerLine, bytesPerLine. The index file produced above looks like:

> cat Homo_sapiens_assembly18.fasta.fai 
chrM    16571   6       50      51
chr1    247249719       16915   50      51
chr2    242951149       252211635       50      51
chr3    199501827       500021813       50      51
chr4    191273063       703513683       50      51
chr5    180857866       898612214       50      51
chr6    170899992       1083087244      50      51
chr7    158821424       1257405242      50      51
chr8    146274826       1419403101      50      51
chr9    140273252       1568603430      50      51
chr10   135374737       1711682155      50      51
chr11   134452384       1849764394      50      51
chr12   132349534       1986905833      50      51
chr13   114142980       2121902365      50      51
chr14   106368585       2238328212      50      51
chr15   100338915       2346824176      50      51
chr16   88827254        2449169877      50      51
chr17   78774742        2539773684      50      51
chr18   76117153        2620123928      50      51
chr19   63811651        2697763432      50      51
chr20   62435964        2762851324      50      51
chr21   46944323        2826536015      50      51
chr22   49691432        2874419232      50      51
chrX    154913754       2925104499      50      51
chrY    57772954        3083116535      50      51
chr1_random     1663265 3142044962      50      51
chr2_random     185571  3143741506      50      51
chr3_random     749256  3143930802      50      51
chr4_random     842648  3144695057      50      51
chr5_random     143687  3145554571      50      51
chr6_random     1875562 3145701145      50      51
chr7_random     549659  3147614232      50      51
chr8_random     943810  3148174898      50      51
chr9_random     1146434 3149137598      50      51
chr10_random    113275  3150306975      50      51
chr11_random    215294  3150422530      50      51
chr13_random    186858  3150642144      50      51
chr15_random    784346  3150832754      50      51
chr16_random    105485  3151632801      50      51
chr17_random    2617613 3151740410      50      51
chr18_random    4262    3154410390      50      51
chr19_random    301858  3154414752      50      51
chr21_random    1679693 3154722662      50      51
chr22_random    257318  3156435963      50      51
chrX_random     1719168 3156698441      50      51

Created 2012-08-10 19:20:46 | Updated 2014-10-16 21:23:42 | Tags: intro queue developer qscript
Comments (11)

1. Introduction

GATK-Queue is command-line scripting framework for defining multi-stage genomic analysis pipelines combined with an execution manager that runs those pipelines from end-to-end. Often processing genome data includes several steps to produces outputs, for example our BAM to VCF calling pipeline include among other things:

  • Local realignment around indels
  • Emitting raw SNP calls
  • Emitting indels
  • Masking the SNPs at indels
  • Annotating SNPs using chip data
  • Labeling suspicious calls based on filters
  • Creating a summary report with statistics

Running these tools one by one in series may often take weeks for processing, or would require custom scripting to try and optimize using parallel resources.

With a Queue script users can semantically define the multiple steps of the pipeline and then hand off the logistics of running the pipeline to completion. Queue runs independent jobs in parallel, handles transient errors, and uses various techniques such as running multiple copies of the same program on different portions of the genome to produce outputs faster.


2. Obtaining Queue

You have two options: download the binary distribution (prepackaged, ready to run program) or build it from source.

- Download the binary

This is obviously the easiest way to go. Links are on the Downloads page. Just get the Queue package; no need to get the GATK package separately as GATK is bundled in with Queue.

- Building Queue from source

Briefly, here's what you need to know/do:

Queue is part of the GATK repository. Download the source from the public repository on Github. Run the following command:

git clone https://github.com/broadgsa/gatk.git

IMPORTANT NOTE: These instructions refer to the MIT-licensed version of the GATK+Queue source code. With that version, you will be able to build Queue itself, as well as the public portion of the GATK (the core framework), but that will not include the GATK analysis tools. If you want to use Queue to pipeline the GATK analysis tools, you need to clone the 'protected' repository. Please note however that part of the source code in that repository (the 'protected' module) is under a different license which excludes for-profit use, modification and redistribution.

Move to the git root directory and use maven to build the source.

mvn clean verify

All dependencies will be managed by Maven as needed.

See this article on how to test your installation of Queue.


3. Running Queue

See this article on running Queue for the first time for full details.

Queue arguments can be listed by running with --help

java -jar dist/Queue.jar --help

To list the arguments required by a QScript, add the script with -S and run with --help.

java -jar dist/Queue.jar -S script.scala --help

Note that by default queue runs in a "dry" mode, as explained in the link above. After verifying the generated commands execute the pipeline by adding -run.

See QFunction and Command Line Options for more info on adjusting Queue options.

4. QScripts

General Information

Queue pipelines are written as Scala 2.8 files with a bit of syntactic sugar, called QScripts.

Every QScript includes the following steps:

  • New instances of CommandLineFunctions are created
  • Input and output arguments are specified on each function
  • The function is added with add() to Queue for dispatch and monitoring

The basic command-line to run the Queue pipelines on the command line is

java -jar Queue.jar -S <script>.scala

See the main article Queue QScripts for more info on QScripts.

Supported QScripts

Most QScripts are analysis pipelines that are custom-built for specific projects, and we currently do not offer any QScripts as supported analysis tools. However, we do provide some example scripts that you can use as basis to write your own QScripts (see below).

Example QScripts

The latest version of the example files are available in the Sting github repository under public/scala/qscript/examples


5. Visualization and Queue

QJobReport

Queue automatically generates GATKReport-formatted runtime information about executed jobs. See this presentation for a general introduction to QJobReport.

Note that Queue attempts to generate a standard visualization using an R script in the GATK public/R repository. You must provide a path to this location if you want the script to run automatically. Additionally the script requires the gsalib to be installed on the machine, which is typically done by providing its path in your .Rprofile file:

bm8da-dbe ~/Desktop/broadLocal/GATK/unstable % cat ~/.Rprofile
.libPaths("/Users/depristo/Desktop/broadLocal/GATK/unstable/public/R/")

Note that gsalib is available from the CRAN repository so you can install it with the canonical R package install command.

Caveats

  • The system only provides information about commands that have just run. Resuming from a partially completed job will only show the information for the jobs that just ran, and not for any of the completed commands. This is due to a structural limitation in Queue, and will be fixed when the Queue infrastructure improves

  • This feature only works for command line and LSF execution models. SGE should be easy to add for a motivated individual but we cannot test this capabilities here at the Broad. Please send us a patch if you do extend Queue to support SGE.

DOT visualization of Pipelines

Queue emits a queue.dot file to help visualize your commands. You can open this file in programs like DOT, OmniGraffle, etc to view your pipelines. By default the system will print out your LSF command lines, but this can be too much in a complex pipeline.

To clarify your pipeline, override the dotString() function:

class CountCovariates(bamIn: File, recalDataIn: File, args: String = "") extends GatkFunction {
    @Input(doc="foo") var bam = bamIn
    @Input(doc="foo") var bamIndex = bai(bamIn)
    @Output(doc="foo") var recalData = recalDataIn
    memoryLimit = Some(4)
    override def dotString = "CountCovariates: %s [args %s]".format(bamIn.getName, args)
    def commandLine = gatkCommandLine("CountCovariates") + args + " -l INFO -D /humgen/gsa-hpprojects/GATK/data/dbsnp_129_hg18.rod -I %s --max_reads_at_locus 20000 -cov ReadGroupCovariate -cov QualityScoreCovariate -cov CycleCovariate -cov DinucCovariate -recalFile %s".format(bam, recalData)
}

Here we only see CountCovariates my.bam [-OQ], for example, in the dot file. The base quality score recalibration pipeline, as visualized by DOT, can be viewed here:

6. Further reading


Created 2012-08-09 04:08:01 | Updated 2013-06-17 21:09:33 | Tags: test official basic analyst intro queue developer install
Comments (12)

Objective

Test that Queue is correctly installed, and that the supporting tools like Java are in your path.

Prerequisites

  • Basic familiarity with the command-line environment
  • Understand what is a PATH variable
  • GATK installed
  • Queue downloaded and placed on path

Steps

  1. Invoke the Queue usage/help message
  2. Troubleshooting

1. Invoke the Queue usage/help message

The command we're going to run is a very simple command that asks Queue to print out a list of available command-line arguments and options. It is so simple that it will ALWAYS work if your Queue package is installed correctly.

Note that this command is also helpful when you're trying to remember something like the right spelling or short name for an argument and for whatever reason you don't have access to the web-based documentation.

Action

Type the following command:

java -jar <path to Queue.jar> --help

replacing the <path to Queue.jar> bit with the path you have set up in your command-line environment.

Expected Result

You should see usage output similar to the following:

usage: java -jar Queue.jar -S <script> [-jobPrefix <job_name_prefix>] [-jobQueue <job_queue>] [-jobProject <job_project>]
       [-jobSGDir <job_scatter_gather_directory>] [-memLimit <default_memory_limit>] [-runDir <run_directory>] [-tempDir
       <temp_directory>] [-emailHost <emailSmtpHost>] [-emailPort <emailSmtpPort>] [-emailTLS] [-emailSSL] [-emailUser
       <emailUsername>] [-emailPass <emailPassword>] [-emailPassFile <emailPasswordFile>] [-bsub] [-run] [-dot <dot_graph>]
       [-expandedDot <expanded_dot_graph>] [-startFromScratch] [-status] [-statusFrom <status_email_from>] [-statusTo
       <status_email_to>] [-keepIntermediates] [-retry <retry_failed>] [-l <logging_level>] [-log <log_to_file>] [-quiet]
       [-debug] [-h]

 -S,--script <script>                                                      QScript scala file
 -jobPrefix,--job_name_prefix <job_name_prefix>                            Default name prefix for compute farm jobs.
 -jobQueue,--job_queue <job_queue>                                         Default queue for compute farm jobs.
 -jobProject,--job_project <job_project>                                   Default project for compute farm jobs.
 -jobSGDir,--job_scatter_gather_directory <job_scatter_gather_directory>   Default directory to place scatter gather
                                                                           output for compute farm jobs.
 -memLimit,--default_memory_limit <default_memory_limit>                   Default memory limit for jobs, in gigabytes.
 -runDir,--run_directory <run_directory>                                   Root directory to run functions from.
 -tempDir,--temp_directory <temp_directory>                                Temp directory to pass to functions.
 -emailHost,--emailSmtpHost <emailSmtpHost>                                Email SMTP host. Defaults to localhost.
 -emailPort,--emailSmtpPort <emailSmtpPort>                                Email SMTP port. Defaults to 465 for ssl,
                                                                           otherwise 25.
 -emailTLS,--emailUseTLS                                                   Email should use TLS. Defaults to false.
 -emailSSL,--emailUseSSL                                                   Email should use SSL. Defaults to false.
 -emailUser,--emailUsername <emailUsername>                                Email SMTP username. Defaults to none.
 -emailPass,--emailPassword <emailPassword>                                Email SMTP password. Defaults to none. Not
                                                                           secure! See emailPassFile.
 -emailPassFile,--emailPasswordFile <emailPasswordFile>                    Email SMTP password file. Defaults to none.
 -bsub,--bsub_all_jobs                                                     Use bsub to submit jobs
 -run,--run_scripts                                                        Run QScripts.  Without this flag set only
                                                                           performs a dry run.
 -dot,--dot_graph <dot_graph>                                              Outputs the queue graph to a .dot file.  See:
                                                                           http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOT_language
 -expandedDot,--expanded_dot_graph <expanded_dot_graph>                    Outputs the queue graph of scatter gather to
                                                                           a .dot file.  Otherwise overwrites the
                                                                           dot_graph
 -startFromScratch,--start_from_scratch                                    Runs all command line functions even if the
                                                                           outputs were previously output successfully.
 -status,--status                                                          Get status of jobs for the qscript
 -statusFrom,--status_email_from <status_email_from>                       Email address to send emails from upon
                                                                           completion or on error.
 -statusTo,--status_email_to <status_email_to>                             Email address to send emails to upon
                                                                           completion or on error.
 -keepIntermediates,--keep_intermediate_outputs                            After a successful run keep the outputs of
                                                                           any Function marked as intermediate.
 -retry,--retry_failed <retry_failed>                                      Retry the specified number of times after a
                                                                           command fails.  Defaults to no retries.
 -l,--logging_level <logging_level>                                        Set the minimum level of logging, i.e.
                                                                           setting INFO get's you INFO up to FATAL,
                                                                           setting ERROR gets you ERROR and FATAL level
                                                                           logging.
 -log,--log_to_file <log_to_file>                                          Set the logging location
 -quiet,--quiet_output_mode                                                Set the logging to quiet mode, no output to
                                                                           stdout
 -debug,--debug_mode                                                       Set the logging file string to include a lot
                                                                           of debugging information (SLOW!)
 -h,--help                                                                 Generate this help message

If you see this message, your Queue installation is ok. You're good to go! If you don't see this message, and instead get an error message, proceed to the next section on troubleshooting.


2. Troubleshooting

Let's try to figure out what's not working.

Action

First, make sure that your Java version is at least 1.6, by typing the following command:

java -version

Expected Result

You should see something similar to the following text:

java version "1.6.0_12"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_12-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 11.2-b01, mixed mode)  

Remedial actions

If the version is less then 1.6, install the newest version of Java onto the system. If you instead see something like

java: Command not found  

make sure that java is installed on your machine, and that your PATH variable contains the path to the java executables.

On a Mac running OS X 10.5+, you may need to run /Applications/Utilities/Java Preferences.app and drag Java SE 6 to the top to make your machine run version 1.6, even if it has been installed.


Created 2012-08-01 15:24:09 | Updated 2013-03-25 18:16:42 | Tags: official analyst intro phone-home key developer intermediate
Comments (0)

1. What it is and how it helps us improve the GATK

Since September, 2010, the GATK has had a "phone-home" feature that sends us information about each GATK run via the Broad filesystem (within the Broad) and Amazon's S3 cloud storage service (outside the Broad). This feature is enabled by default.

The information provided by the phone-home feature is critical in driving improvements to the GATK

  • By recording detailed information about each error that occurs, it enables GATK developers to identify and fix previously-unknown bugs in the GATK. We are constantly monitoring the errors our users encounter and do our best to fix those errors that are caused by bugs in our code.
  • It allows us to better understand how the GATK is used in practice and adjust our documentation and development goals for common use cases.
  • It gives us a picture of which versions of the GATK are in use over time, and how successful we've been at encouraging users to migrate from obsolete or broken versions of the GATK to newer, improved versions.
  • It tells us which tools are most commonly used, allowing us to monitor the adoption of newly-released tools and abandonment of outdated tools.
  • It provides us with a sense of the overall size of our user base and the major organizations/institutions using the GATK.

2. What information is sent to us

Below are two example GATK Run Reports showing exactly what information is sent to us each time the GATK phones home.

A successful run:

<GATK-run-report>
    <id>D7D31ULwTSxlAwnEOSmW6Z4PawXwMxEz</id>
    <start-time>2012/03/10 20.21.19</start-time>
    <end-time>2012/03/10 20.21.19</end-time>
    <run-time>0</run-time>
    <walker-name>CountReads</walker-name>
    <svn-version>1.4-483-g63ecdb2</svn-version>
    <total-memory>85000192</total-memory>
    <max-memory>129957888</max-memory>
    <user-name>depristo</user-name>
    <host-name>10.0.1.10</host-name>
    <java>Apple Inc.-1.6.0_26</java>
    <machine>Mac OS X-x86_64</machine>
    <iterations>105</iterations>
</GATK-run-report>

A run where an exception has occurred:

<GATK-run-report>
   <id>yX3AnltsqIlXH9kAQqTWHQUd8CQ5bikz</id>   
   <exception>
      <message>Failed to parse Genome Location string: 20:10,000,000-10,000,001x</message>
      <stacktrace class="java.util.ArrayList"> 
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.utils.GenomeLocParser.parseGenomeLoc(GenomeLocParser.java:377)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.utils.interval.IntervalUtils.parseIntervalArguments(IntervalUtils.java:82)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.IntervalBinding.getIntervals(IntervalBinding.java:106)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.loadIntervals(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:618)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.initializeIntervals(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:585)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.execute(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:231)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.CommandLineExecutable.execute(CommandLineExecutable.java:128)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.CommandLineProgram.start(CommandLineProgram.java:236)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.CommandLineProgram.start(CommandLineProgram.java:146)</string>
         <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.CommandLineGATK.main(CommandLineGATK.java:92)</string>
      </stacktrace>
      <cause>
         <message>Position: &apos;10,000,001x&apos; contains invalid chars.</message>
         <stacktrace class="java.util.ArrayList">
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.utils.GenomeLocParser.parsePosition(GenomeLocParser.java:411)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.utils.GenomeLocParser.parseGenomeLoc(GenomeLocParser.java:374)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.utils.interval.IntervalUtils.parseIntervalArguments(IntervalUtils.java:82)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.IntervalBinding.getIntervals(IntervalBinding.java:106)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.loadIntervals(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:618)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.initializeIntervals(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:585)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.GenomeAnalysisEngine.execute(GenomeAnalysisEngine.java:231)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.CommandLineExecutable.execute(CommandLineExecutable.java:128)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.CommandLineProgram.start(CommandLineProgram.java:236)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.commandline.CommandLineProgram.start(CommandLineProgram.java:146)</string>
            <string>org.broadinstitute.sting.gatk.CommandLineGATK.main(CommandLineGATK.java:92)</string>
         </stacktrace>
         <is-user-exception>false</is-user-exception>
      </cause>
      <is-user-exception>true</is-user-exception>
   </exception>
   <start-time>2012/03/10 20.19.52</start-time>
   <end-time>2012/03/10 20.19.52</end-time>
   <run-time>0</run-time>
   <walker-name>CountReads</walker-name>
   <svn-version>1.4-483-g63ecdb2</svn-version>
   <total-memory>85000192</total-memory>
   <max-memory>129957888</max-memory>
   <user-name>depristo</user-name>
   <host-name>10.0.1.10</host-name>
   <java>Apple Inc.-1.6.0_26</java>
   <machine>Mac OS X-x86_64</machine>
   <iterations>0</iterations>
</GATK-run-report>

Note that as of GATK 1.5 we no longer collect information about the command-line executed, the working directory, or tmp directory.

3. Disabling Phone Home

The GATK is currently in the process of evolving to require interaction with Amazon S3 as a normal part of each run. For this reason, and because the information contained in the GATK run reports is so critical in driving improvements to the GATK, we strongly discourage our users from disabling the phone-home feature.

At the same time, we recognize that some of our users do have legitimate reasons for needing to run the GATK with phone-home disabled, and we don't wish to make it impossible for these users to run the GATK.

Examples of legitimate reasons for disabling Phone Home

  • Technical reasons: Your local network might have restrictions in place that don't allow the GATK to access external resources, or you might need to run the GATK in a network-less environment.

  • Organizational reasons: Your organization's policies might forbid the dissemination of one or more pieces of information contained in the GATK run report.

For such users we have provided an -et NO_ET option in the GATK to disable the phone-home feature. To use this option in GATK 1.5 and later, you need to contact us to request a key. Instructions for doing so are below.

How to obtain and use a GATK key

To obtain a GATK key, please fill out the request form.

Running the GATK with a key is simple: you just need to append a -K your.key argument to your customary command line, where your.key is the path to the key file you obtained from us:

java -jar dist/GenomeAnalysisTK.jar \
    -T PrintReads \
    -I public/testdata/exampleBAM.bam \
    -R public/testdata/exampleFASTA.fasta \
    -et NO_ET \
    -K your.key

The -K argument is only necessary when running the GATK with the NO_ET option.

Troubleshooting key-related problems

  • Corrupt/Unreadable/Revoked Keys

If you get an error message from the GATK saying that your key is corrupt, unreadable, or has been revoked, please email '''gsahelp@broadinstitute.org''' to ask for a replacement key.

  • GATK Public Key Not Found

If you get an error message stating that the GATK public key could not be located or read, then something is likely wrong with your build of the GATK. If you're running the binary release, try downloading it again. If you're compiling from source, try doing an ant clean and re-compiling. If all else fails, please ask for help on our community forum.

What does GSA use Phone Home data for?

We use the phone home data for three main purposes. First, we monitor the input logs for errors that occur in the GATK, and proactively fix them in the codebase. Second, we monitor the usage rates of the GATK in general and specific versions of the GATK to explain how widely used the GATK is to funding agencies and other potential supporters. Finally, we monitor adoption rates of specific GATK tools to understand how quickly new tools reach our users. Many of these analyses require us to aggregate the data by unique user, which is why we still collect the username of the individual who ran the GATK (as you can see in the plots). Examples of all three uses are shown in the Tableau graphs below, which update each night and are sent to the GATK members each morning for review.


Created 2012-07-25 21:19:45 | Updated 2013-08-27 18:55:56 | Tags: official basic analyst intro tutorial developer run
Comments (1)

NOTICE:

This tutorial is slightly out of date so the output is a little different. We'll update this soon, but in the meantime, don't freak out if you get a result that reads something like

INFO 18:32:38,826 CountReads - CountReads counted 33 reads in the traversal 

instead of

INFO  16:17:46,061 Walker - [REDUCE RESULT] Traversal result is: 33 

You're doing the right thing and getting the right result.

And of course, in doubt, just post a comment on this article; we're here to answer your questions.


Objective

Run a basic analysis command on example data.

Prerequisites

Steps

  1. Invoke the GATK CountReads command
  2. Further exercises

1. Invoke the GATK CountReads command

A very simple analysis that you can do with the GATK is getting a count of the reads in a BAM file. The GATK is capable of much more powerful analyses, but this is a good starting example because there are very few things that can go wrong.

So we are going to count the reads in the file exampleBAM.bam, which you can find in the GATK resource bundle along with its associated index (same file name with .bai extension), as well as the example reference exampleFASTA.fasta and its associated index (same file name with .fai extension) and dictionary (same file name with .dict extension). Copy them to your working directory so that your directory contents look like this:

[bm4dd-56b:~/codespace/gatk/sandbox] vdauwera% ls -la
drwxr-xr-x  9 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     306 Jul 25 16:29 .
drwxr-xr-x@ 6 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     204 Jul 25 15:31 ..
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users    3635 Apr 10 07:39 exampleBAM.bam
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     232 Apr 10 07:39 exampleBAM.bam.bai
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     148 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.dict
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users  101673 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.fasta
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users      20 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.fasta.fai

Action

Type the following command:

java -jar <path to GenomeAnalysisTK.jar> -T CountReads -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam 

where -T CountReads specifies which analysis tool we want to use, -R exampleFASTA.fasta specifies the reference sequence, and -I exampleBAM.bam specifies the file of aligned reads we want to analyze.

For any analysis that you want to run on a set of aligned reads, you will always need to use at least these three arguments:

  • -T for the tool name, which specifices the corresponding analysis
  • -R for the reference sequence file
  • -I for the input BAM file of aligned reads

They don't have to be in that order in your command, but this way you can remember that you need them if you TRI...

Expected Result

After a few seconds you should see output that looks like to this:

INFO  16:17:45,945 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:17:45,946 HelpFormatter - The Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) v2.0-22-g40f97eb, Compiled 2012/07/25 15:29:41 
INFO  16:17:45,947 HelpFormatter - Copyright (c) 2010 The Broad Institute 
INFO  16:17:45,947 HelpFormatter - For support and documentation go to http://www.broadinstitute.org/gatk 
INFO  16:17:45,947 HelpFormatter - Program Args: -T CountReads -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam 
INFO  16:17:45,947 HelpFormatter - Date/Time: 2012/07/25 16:17:45 
INFO  16:17:45,947 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:17:45,948 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:17:45,950 GenomeAnalysisEngine - Strictness is SILENT 
INFO  16:17:45,982 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Initializing SAMRecords in serial 
INFO  16:17:45,993 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Done initializing BAM readers: total time 0.01 
INFO  16:17:46,060 TraversalEngine - [INITIALIZATION COMPLETE; TRAVERSAL STARTING] 
INFO  16:17:46,060 TraversalEngine -        Location processed.reads  runtime per.1M.reads completed total.runtime remaining 
INFO  16:17:46,061 Walker - [REDUCE RESULT] Traversal result is: 33 
INFO  16:17:46,061 TraversalEngine - Total runtime 0.00 secs, 0.00 min, 0.00 hours 
INFO  16:17:46,100 TraversalEngine - 0 reads were filtered out during traversal out of 33 total (0.00%) 
INFO  16:17:46,729 GATKRunReport - Uploaded run statistics report to AWS S3 

Depending on the GATK release, you may see slightly different information output, but you know everything is running correctly if you see the line:

INFO  21:53:04,556 Walker - [REDUCE RESULT] Traversal result is: 33 

somewhere in your output.

If you don't see this, check your spelling (GATK commands are case-sensitive), check that the files are in your working directory, and if necessary, re-check that the GATK is properly installed.

If you do see this output, congratulations! You just successfully ran you first GATK analysis!

Basically the output you see means that the CountReadsWalker (which you invoked with the command line option -T CountReads) counted 33 reads in the exampleBAM.bam file, which is exactly what we expect to see.

Wait, what is this walker thing?

In the GATK jargon, we call the tools walkers because the way they work is that they walk through the dataset --either along the reference sequence (LocusWalkers), or down the list of reads in the BAM file (ReadWalkers)-- collecting the requested information along the way.


2. Further Exercises

Now that you're rocking the read counts, you can start to expand your use of the GATK command line.

Let's say you don't care about counting reads anymore; now you want to know the number of loci (positions on the genome) that are covered by one or more reads. The name of the tool, or walker, that does this is CountLoci. Since the structure of the GATK command is basically always the same, you can simply switch the tool name, right?

Action

Instead of this command, which we used earlier:

java -jar <path to GenomeAnalysisTK.jar> -T CountReads -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam 

this time you type this:

java -jar <path to GenomeAnalysisTK.jar> -T CountLoci -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam 

See the difference?

Result

You should see something like this output:

INFO  16:18:26,183 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:18:26,185 HelpFormatter - The Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) v2.0-22-g40f97eb, Compiled 2012/07/25 15:29:41 
INFO  16:18:26,185 HelpFormatter - Copyright (c) 2010 The Broad Institute 
INFO  16:18:26,185 HelpFormatter - For support and documentation go to http://www.broadinstitute.org/gatk 
INFO  16:18:26,186 HelpFormatter - Program Args: -T CountLoci -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam 
INFO  16:18:26,186 HelpFormatter - Date/Time: 2012/07/25 16:18:26 
INFO  16:18:26,186 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:18:26,186 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:18:26,189 GenomeAnalysisEngine - Strictness is SILENT 
INFO  16:18:26,222 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Initializing SAMRecords in serial 
INFO  16:18:26,233 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Done initializing BAM readers: total time 0.01 
INFO  16:18:26,351 TraversalEngine - [INITIALIZATION COMPLETE; TRAVERSAL STARTING] 
INFO  16:18:26,351 TraversalEngine -        Location processed.sites  runtime per.1M.sites completed total.runtime remaining 
2052
INFO  16:18:26,411 TraversalEngine - Total runtime 0.08 secs, 0.00 min, 0.00 hours 
INFO  16:18:26,450 TraversalEngine - 0 reads were filtered out during traversal out of 33 total (0.00%) 
INFO  16:18:27,124 GATKRunReport - Uploaded run statistics report to AWS S3 

Great! But wait -- where's the result? Last time the result was given on this line:

INFO  21:53:04,556 Walker - [REDUCE RESULT] Traversal result is: 33 

But this time there is no line that says [REDUCE RESULT]! Is something wrong?

Not really. The program ran just fine -- but we forgot to give it an output file name. You see, the CountLoci walker is set up to output the result of its calculations to a text file, unlike CountReads, which is perfectly happy to output its result to the terminal screen.

Action

So we repeat the command, but this time we specify an output file, like this:

java -jar <path to GenomeAnalysisTK.jar> -T CountLoci -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam -o output.txt

where -o (lowercase o, not zero) is used to specify the output.

Result

You should get essentially the same output on the terminal screen as previously (but notice the difference in the line that contains Program Args -- the new argument is included):

INFO  16:29:15,451 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:29:15,453 HelpFormatter - The Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) v2.0-22-g40f97eb, Compiled 2012/07/25 15:29:41 
INFO  16:29:15,453 HelpFormatter - Copyright (c) 2010 The Broad Institute 
INFO  16:29:15,453 HelpFormatter - For support and documentation go to http://www.broadinstitute.org/gatk 
INFO  16:29:15,453 HelpFormatter - Program Args: -T CountLoci -R exampleFASTA.fasta -I exampleBAM.bam -o output.txt 
INFO  16:29:15,454 HelpFormatter - Date/Time: 2012/07/25 16:29:15 
INFO  16:29:15,454 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:29:15,454 HelpFormatter - --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INFO  16:29:15,457 GenomeAnalysisEngine - Strictness is SILENT 
INFO  16:29:15,488 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Initializing SAMRecords in serial 
INFO  16:29:15,499 SAMDataSource$SAMReaders - Done initializing BAM readers: total time 0.01 
INFO  16:29:15,618 TraversalEngine - [INITIALIZATION COMPLETE; TRAVERSAL STARTING] 
INFO  16:29:15,618 TraversalEngine -        Location processed.sites  runtime per.1M.sites completed total.runtime remaining 
INFO  16:29:15,679 TraversalEngine - Total runtime 0.08 secs, 0.00 min, 0.00 hours 
INFO  16:29:15,718 TraversalEngine - 0 reads were filtered out during traversal out of 33 total (0.00%) 
INFO  16:29:16,712 GATKRunReport - Uploaded run statistics report to AWS S3 

This time however, if we look inside the working directory, there is a newly created file there called output.txt.

[bm4dd-56b:~/codespace/gatk/sandbox] vdauwera% ls -la
drwxr-xr-x  9 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     306 Jul 25 16:29 .
drwxr-xr-x@ 6 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     204 Jul 25 15:31 ..
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users    3635 Apr 10 07:39 exampleBAM.bam
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     232 Apr 10 07:39 exampleBAM.bam.bai
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users     148 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.dict
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users  101673 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.fasta
-rw-r--r--@ 1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users      20 Apr 10 07:39 exampleFASTA.fasta.fai
-rw-r--r--  1 vdauwera  CHARLES\Domain Users       5 Jul 25 16:29 output.txt

This file contains the result of the analysis:

[bm4dd-56b:~/codespace/gatk/sandbox] vdauwera% cat output.txt 
2052

This means that there are 2052 loci in the reference sequence that are covered by at least one or more reads in the BAM file.

Discussion

Okay then, but why not show the full, correct command in the first place? Because this was a good opportunity for you to learn a few of the caveats of the GATK command system, which may save you a lot of frustration later on.

Beyond the common basic arguments that almost all GATK walkers require, most of them also have specific requirements or options that are important to how they work. You should always check what are the specific arguments that are required, recommended and/or optional for the walker you want to use before starting an analysis.

Fortunately the GATK is set up to complain (i.e. terminate with an error message) if you try to run it without specifying a required argument. For example, if you try to run this:

java -jar <path to GenomeAnalysisTK.jar> -T CountLoci -R exampleFASTA.fasta

the GATK will spit out a wall of text, including the basic usage guide that you can invoke with the --help option, and more importantly, the following error message:

##### ERROR ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
##### ERROR A USER ERROR has occurred (version 2.0-22-g40f97eb): 
##### ERROR The invalid arguments or inputs must be corrected before the GATK can proceed
##### ERROR Please do not post this error to the GATK forum
##### ERROR
##### ERROR See the documentation (rerun with -h) for this tool to view allowable command-line arguments.
##### ERROR Visit our website and forum for extensive documentation and answers to 
##### ERROR commonly asked questions http://www.broadinstitute.org/gatk
##### ERROR
##### ERROR MESSAGE: Walker requires reads but none were provided.
##### ERROR ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You see the line that says ERROR MESSAGE: Walker requires reads but none were provided? This tells you exactly what was wrong with your command.

So the GATK will not run if a walker does not have all the required inputs. That's a good thing! But in the case of our first attempt at running CountLoci, the -o argument is not required by the GATK to run -- it's just highly desirable if you actually want the result of the analysis!

There will be many other cases of walkers with arguments that are not strictly required, but highly desirable if you want the results to be meaningful.

So, at the risk of getting repetitive, always read the documentation of each walker that you want to use!


Created 2012-07-25 16:44:53 | Updated 2015-04-08 21:15:04 | Tags: fastareference intro inputs intervals
Comments (5)

All analyses done with the GATK typically involve several (though not necessarily all) of the following inputs:

  • Reference genome sequence
  • Sequencing reads
  • Intervals of interest
  • Reference-ordered data

This article describes the corresponding file formats that are acceptable for use with the GATK.

1. Reference Genome Sequence

The GATK requires the reference sequence in a single reference sequence in FASTA format, with all contigs in the same file. The GATK requires strict adherence to the FASTA standard. All the standard IUPAC bases are accepted, but keep in mind that non-standard bases (i.e. other than ACGT, such as W for example) will be ignored (i.e. those positions in the genome will be skipped).

Some users have reported having issues with reference files that have been stored or modified on Windows filesystems. The issues manifest as "10" characters (corresponding to encoded newlines) inserted in the sequence, which cause the GATK to quit with an error. If you encounter this issue, you will need to re-download a valid master copy of the reference file, or clean it up yourself.

Gzipped fasta files will not work with the GATK, so please make sure to unzip them first. Please see this article for more information on preparing FASTA reference sequences for use with the GATK.

Important note about human genome reference versions

If you are using human data, your reads must be aligned to one of the official b3x (e.g. b36, b37) or hg1x (e.g. hg18, hg19) references. The names and order of the contigs in the reference you used must exactly match that of one of the official references canonical orderings. These are defined by historical karotyping of largest to smallest chromosomes, followed by the X, Y, and MT for the b3x references; the order is thus 1, 2, 3, ..., 10, 11, 12, ... 20, 21, 22, X, Y, MT. The hg1x references differ in that the chromosome names are prefixed with "chr" and chrM appears first instead of last. The GATK will detect misordered contigs (for example, lexicographically sorted) and throw an error. This draconian approach, though unnecessary technically, ensures that all supplementary data provided with the GATK works correctly. You can use ReorderSam to fix a BAM file aligned to a missorted reference sequence.

Our Best Practice recommendation is that you use a standard GATK reference from the GATK resource bundle.

2. Sequencing Reads

The only input format for sequence reads that the GATK itself supports is the [Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM)] format. See [SAM/BAM] for more details on the SAM/BAM format as well as Samtools and Picard, two complementary sets of utilities for working with SAM/BAM files.

If you don't find the information you need in this section, please see our FAQs on BAM files.

If you are starting out your pipeline with raw reads (typically in FASTQ format) you'll need to make sure that when you map those reads to the reference and produce a BAM file, the resulting BAM file is fully compliant with the GATK requirements. See the Best Practices documentation for detailed instructions on how to do this.

In addition to being in SAM format, we require the following additional constraints in order to use your file with the GATK:

  • The file must be binary (with .bam file extension).
  • The file must be indexed.
  • The file must be sorted in coordinate order with respect to the reference (i.e. the contig ordering in your bam must exactly match that of the reference you are using).
  • The file must have a proper bam header with read groups. Each read group must contain the platform (PL) and sample (SM) tags. For the platform value, we currently support 454, LS454, Illumina, Solid, ABI_Solid, and CG (all case-insensitive).
  • Each read in the file must be associated with exactly one read group.

Below is an example well-formed SAM field header and fields (with @SQ dictionary truncated to show only the first two chromosomes for brevity):

@HD     VN:1.0  GO:none SO:coordinate
@SQ     SN:1    LN:249250621    AS:NCBI37       UR:file:/lustre/scratch102/projects/g1k/ref/main_project/human_g1k_v37.fasta    M5:1b22b98cdeb4a9304cb5d48026a85128
@SQ     SN:2    LN:243199373    AS:NCBI37       UR:file:/lustre/scratch102/projects/g1k/ref/main_project/human_g1k_v37.fasta    M5:a0d9851da00400dec1098a9255ac712e
@RG     ID:ERR000162    PL:ILLUMINA     LB:g1k-sc-NA12776-CEU-1 PI:200  DS:SRP000031    SM:NA12776      CN:SC
@RG     ID:ERR000252    PL:ILLUMINA     LB:g1k-sc-NA12776-CEU-1 PI:200  DS:SRP000031    SM:NA12776      CN:SC
@RG     ID:ERR001684    PL:ILLUMINA     LB:g1k-sc-NA12776-CEU-1 PI:200  DS:SRP000031    SM:NA12776      CN:SC
@RG     ID:ERR001685    PL:ILLUMINA     LB:g1k-sc-NA12776-CEU-1 PI:200  DS:SRP000031    SM:NA12776      CN:SC
@PG     ID:GATK TableRecalibration      VN:v2.2.16      CL:Covariates=[ReadGroupCovariate, QualityScoreCovariate, DinucCovariate, CycleCovariate], use_original_quals=true, defau 
t_read_group=DefaultReadGroup, default_platform=Illumina, force_read_group=null, force_platform=null, solid_recal_mode=SET_Q_ZERO, window_size_nqs=5, homopolymer_nback=7, except on_if_no_tile=false, pQ=5, maxQ=40, smoothing=137       UR:file:/lustre/scratch102/projects/g1k/ref/main_project/human_g1k_v37.fasta    M5:b4eb71ee878d3706246b7c1dbef69299
@PG     ID:bwa  VN:0.5.5
ERR001685.4315085       16      1       9997    25      35M     *       0       0       CCGATCTCCCTAACCCTAACCCTAACCCTAACCCT     ?8:C7ACAABBCBAAB?CCAABBEBA@ACEBBB@?     XT:A:U  XN:i:4    X0:i:1  X1:i:0  XM:i:2  XO:i:0  XG:i:0  RG:Z:ERR001685  NM:i:6  MD:Z:0N0N0N0N1A0A28     OQ:Z:>>:>2>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>?>>>>??>???>
ERR001689.1165834       117     1       9997    0       *       =       9997    0       CCGATCTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGG     >7AA<@@C?@?B?B??>9?B??>A?B???BAB??@     RG:Z:ERR001689    OQ:Z:>:<<8<<<><<><><<>7<>>>?>>??>???????
ERR001689.1165834       185     1       9997    25      35M     =       9997    0       CCGATCTCCCTAACCCTAACCCTAACCCTAACCCT     758A:?>>8?=@@>>?;4<>=??@@==??@?==?8     XT:A:U  XN:i:4    SM:i:25 AM:i:0  X0:i:1  X1:i:0  XM:i:2  XO:i:0  XG:i:0  RG:Z:ERR001689  NM:i:6  MD:Z:0N0N0N0N1A0A28     OQ:Z:;74>7><><><>>>>><:<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
ERR001688.2681347       117     1       9998    0       *       =       9998    0       CGATCTTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGGTTAGGG     5@BA@A6B???A?B??>B@B??>B@B??>BAB???     RG:Z:ERR001688    OQ:Z:=>>>><4><<?><??????????????????????       

Note about fixing BAM files with alternative sortings

The GATK requires that the BAM file be sorted in the same order as the reference. Unfortunately, many BAM files have headers that are sorted in some other order -- lexicographical order is a common alternative. To resort the BAM file please use ReorderSam.

3. Intervals of interest

If you don't find the information you need in this section, please see our FAQs on interval lists.

The GATK accept interval files for processing subsets of the genome in Picard-style interval lists. These files typically have an extension such as '.list' or more explicitly,.interval_list`, and look like this:

@HD     VN:1.0  SO:coordinate
@SQ     SN:1    LN:249250621    AS:GRCh37       UR:http://www.broadinstitute.org/ftp/pub/seq/references/Homo_sapiens_assembly19.fasta   M5:1b22b98cdeb4a9304cb5d48026a85128     SP:Homo Sapiens
@SQ     SN:2    LN:243199373    AS:GRCh37       UR:http://www.broadinstitute.org/ftp/pub/seq/references/Homo_sapiens_assembly19.fasta   M5:a0d9851da00400dec1098a9255ac712e     SP:Homo Sapiens
1       30366   30503   +       target_1
1       69089   70010   +       target_2
1       367657  368599  +       target_3
1       621094  622036  +       target_4
1       861320  861395  +       target_5
1       865533  865718  +       target_6
...

consisting of aSAM-file-like sequence dictionary (the header), and targets in the form of <chr> <start> <stop> + <target_name>. These interval lists are tab-delimited. They are also 1-based (first position in the genome is position 1, not position 0). The easiest way to create such a file is to combine your reference file's sequence dictionary (the file stored alongside the reference fasta file with the .dict extension) and your intervals into one file.

You can also specify a list of intervals formatted as <chr>:<start>-<stop> (one interval per line). No sequence dictionary is necessary. This file format also uses 1-based coordinates. Note that only the <chr> part is strictly required; if you just want to specify chromosomes/ contigs as opposed to specific coordinate ranges, you don't need to specify the rest. Both <chr>:<start>-<stop> and <chr> can be present in the same file. You can also specify intervals in this format directly at the command line instead of writing them in a file.

Finally, we also accept BED style interval lists. Warning: this file format is 0-based for the start coordinates, so coordinates taken from 1-based formats should be offset by 1.

4. Reference Ordered Data (ROD) file formats

The GATK can associate arbitrary reference ordered data (ROD) files with named tracks for all tools. Some tools require specific ROD data files for processing, and developers are free to write tools that access arbitrary data sets using the ROD interface. The general ROD system has the following syntax:

-argumentName:name,type file

Where name is the name in the GATK tool (like "eval" in VariantEval), type is the type of the file, such as VCF or dbSNP, and file is the path to the file containing the ROD data.

The GATK supports several common file formats for reading ROD data:

  • VCF : VCF type, the recommended format for representing variant loci and genotype calls. The GATK will only process valid VCF files; VCFTools provides the official VCF validator. See here for a useful poster detailing the VCF specification.
  • UCSC formated dbSNP : dbSNP type, UCSC dbSNP database output
  • BED : BED type, a general purpose format for representing genomic interval data, useful for masks and other interval outputs. Please note that the bed format is 0-based while most other formats are 1-based.

Note that we no longer support the PED format. See here for converting .ped files to VCF.

If you need additional information on VCF files, please see our FAQs on VCF files here and here.

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