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Bernardo Sabatini

Bernardo Sabatini, M.D., Ph.D.

Bernardo Sabatini is an associate member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a professor in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His laboratory focuses on understanding the function and regulation of synapses in the mammalian brain with a particular focus on these processes in the basal ganglia, an evolutionarily conserved brain region that controls many aspects of behavior and whose perturbation leads to devastating neuropsychiatric diseases. In order to conduct their studies, members of Sabatini’s laboratory create new methods to be able to observe and manipulate the biochemical signaling within neurons. Lab members strive to understand how these processes contribute normally to animal behavior, as well as how their perturbation produces neuropsychiatric disease. 

In addition to his role at the Broad, Sabatini has contributed to a number of research and nonprofit organizations both domestically and abroad with interests in advancing the understanding and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. He serves on the advisory board or council of the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, the MQ organization (UK), and the Telethon Foundation (Italy), among others.  He currently serves as a co-director of the Harvard Kempner Institute for the Study of Natural and Artificial Intelligence.  

Sabatini obtained a Ph.D. from the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School and his M.D. degree from the Harvard/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Program in Health Sciences and Technology in 1999.  He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Karel Svoboda at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York.  After his postdoctoral research, Sabatini joined the faculty in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School in 2001. Sabatini was named an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 2008, the Takeda Professor of Neurobiology in 2010, and the Alice and Rodman W. Moorhead III Professor of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School in 2014. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences

May 2022