InfoPhoto

  • The Broad's festive science images, part 5: Liver cells, in color

    Leah Eisenstadt, January 5th, 2011 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We posted a few at the end of 2010, and here's one more!

    This stunning picture is a false-colored microscopic image of human liver cells grown with mouse fibroblasts in vitro. The cellular model is useful for identifying changes in liver cells when treated with drugs. In this image, a blue stain marks the liver cell DNA, and green stains the cells' endoplasmic reticulum.

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 4: Triangular cells

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 29th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 3: Chemical screening data

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 28th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 2: Neuronal culture from stem cells

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 27th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

    The image on the right, contributed by Rakesh Karmacharya, features a neuronal culture derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Neurons are in green, glial cells are in red and the blue stain shows cell nuclei.

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 1: Dendritic networks

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 24th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

    This pair of images below displays neuronal dendrites, which resemble wintry, cracked ice on a frozen pond.

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  • Beautiful science

    Ellen Clegg, December 8th, 2010 | Filed under

    We were sorting through scientific images recently, cataloguing and filing in a well-intentioned year-end swirl. This caught our eye: it's an islet of Langerhans that has been isolated from a human pancreas and stained to highlight the expression of insulin and glucagon, the hormones that regulate blood sugar. Beta cells, which produce the insulin needed to help lower blood sugar, show up as red. The green cells are alpha cells that express glucagon, which raises blood sugar. (The cell culture and microscopy was done by Deepika Walpita here at the Broad.)

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  • InfoPhoto: Transparent Design

    Leah Eisenstadt, October 25th, 2010 | Filed under


     

    The Broad Institute aims for transparency to make its data and software freely available to the scientific community. That transparency is also seen in the buildings' design. Glass walls in offices, labs, and conference rooms reflect the "open-access" nature of the institute.

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  • Pages from the first human genome

    Anne Buboltz, October 18th, 2010 | Filed under

    Six years ago this week, hundreds of researchers were awaiting the publication of their landmark study that focused on one thing ⎯ the human genome. In their study, the researchers described the complete sequence of human DNA, the order in which 3 billion genetics bases, or letters, appear along a strand of DNA.

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  • Info-Foto

    Anne Buboltz, July 23rd, 2010 | Filed under

    The Broad Institute is home to the DNAtrium, a museum of interactive exhibits showcasing the fascinating world of genomic research, new scientific instruments and the researchers who are driving forward progress in biology and medicine.

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