Klarman Cell Observatory

Human diseases arise from malfunctions in the cellular processes that control physiology – a key component is missing or defective; a key ‘circuit’ is over- or under-active. To understand disease and develop effective treatments, we need a comprehensive picture of all the cellular components and all of the cellular circuits in which they function.  

The Broad Institute’s Klarman Cell Observatory, established by the Klarman Family Foundation, is a pilot effort to systematically define cellular circuits in mammalian cells. It builds on breakthrough technologies and on collaborations that cut across scientific disciplines.  
 

Latest publications from the Klarman Cell Observatory:

RNA sequencing of over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling gene expression heterogeneity and reveals general strategies for how cell populations establish complex dynamic responses to stimuli. Read more...

Single-cell RNA sequencing of 430 cells from primary glioblastomas uncovers previously unappreciated intratumoral heterogeneity of gene expression in diverse regulatory programs central to glioblastoma biology, prognosis, and therapy. Read more...

KCO scientists use genome engineering technology to model complex human myeloid cancers in mice, suggesting that this strategy will be useful to engineer many more cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease. Read more...