Tagged with #gatkreport
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A GATKReport is simply a text document that contains well-formatted, easy to read representation of some tabular data. Many GATK tools output their results as GATKReports, so it's important to understand how they are formatted and how you can use them in further analyses.

Here's a simple example:

#:GATKReport.v1.0:2
#:GATKTable:true:2:9:%.18E:%.15f:;
#:GATKTable:ErrorRatePerCycle:The error rate per sequenced position in the reads
cycle  errorrate.61PA8.7         qualavg.61PA8.7                                         
0      7.451835696110506E-3      25.474613284804366                                      
1      2.362777171937477E-3      29.844949954504095                                      
2      9.087604507451836E-4      32.875909752547310
3      5.452562704471102E-4      34.498999090081895                                      
4      9.087604507451836E-4      35.148316651501370                                       
5      5.452562704471102E-4      36.072234352256190                                       
6      5.452562704471102E-4      36.121724890829700                                        
7      5.452562704471102E-4      36.191048034934500                                        
8      5.452562704471102E-4      36.003457059679770                                       

#:GATKTable:false:2:3:%s:%c:;
#:GATKTable:TableName:Description
key    column
1:1000  T 
1:1001  A 
1:1002  C 

This report contains two individual GATK report tables. Every table begins with a header for its metadata and then a header for its name and description. The next row contains the column names followed by the data.

We provide an R library called gsalib that allows you to load GATKReport files into R for further analysis. Here are four simple steps to getting gsalib, installing it and loading a report.

1. Start R (or open RStudio)

$ R

R version 2.11.0 (2010-04-22)
Copyright (C) 2010 The R Foundation for Statistical Computing
ISBN 3-900051-07-0

R is free software and comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
You are welcome to redistribute it under certain conditions.
Type 'license()' or 'licence()' for distribution details.

  Natural language support but running in an English locale

R is a collaborative project with many contributors.
Type 'contributors()' for more information and
'citation()' on how to cite R or R packages in publications.

Type 'demo()' for some demos, 'help()' for on-line help, or
'help.start()' for an HTML browser interface to help.
Type 'q()' to quit R.

2. Get the gsalib library from CRAN

The gsalib library is available on the Comprehensive R Archive Network, so you can just do:

> install.packages("gsalib") 

From within R (we use RStudio for convenience).

In some cases you need to explicitly tell R where to find the library; you can do this as follows:

$ cat .Rprofile 
.libPaths("/path/to/Sting/R/")

3. Load the gsalib library

> library(gsalib)

4. Finally, load the GATKReport file and have fun

> d = gsa.read.gatkreport("/path/to/my.gatkreport")
> summary(d)
              Length Class      Mode
CountVariants 27     data.frame list
CompOverlap   13     data.frame list
No posts found with the requested search criteria.
Comments (8)

In the output grp file,

#:GATKReport.v1.1:1
#:GATKTable:3:880:%s:%s:%s:;
#:GATKTable:BaseCoverageDistribution:A simplified GATK table report
Coverage  Count    Filtered
       0  2859049   2932784
       1   856997    837791
       2   288587    276253
       3    95618     91703

what's the meaning of the three columns?

Thanks,

Comments (5)

Hi,

I just finished running a fairly large number of WGS samples through HaplotypeCaller and I've been using VariantEval to look at some summary stats on these samples. I've noticed that under '#:GATKTable:VariantSummary:1000 Genomes Phase I summary of variants table' there's a section on structural variations and that apparently I'm getting about 3500 in one of my samples. Here's the actual section of the table in question:

#:GATKTable:20:3:%s:%s:%s:%s:%s:%d:%d:%d:%.2f:%s:%d:%.2f:%.1f:%d:%s:%d:%.1f:%d:%s:%d:;
#:GATKTable:VariantSummary:1000 Genomes Phase I summary of variants table
VariantSummary  CompRod  EvalRod  JexlExpression  Novelty  nSamples  nProcessedLoci  nSNPs    TiTvRatio  SNPNoveltyRate  nSNPsPerSample  TiTvRatioPerSample  SNPDPPerSample  nIndels  IndelNoveltyRate  nIndelsPerSample  IndelDPPerSample  nSVs  SVNoveltyRate  nSVsPerSample
VariantSummary  dbsnp    vcf1     none            all             1      3095693981  3446166       2.08            1.34         3446166                2.08             0.0   962028             15.33            962028               0.0  3282          73.58           3282
VariantSummary  dbsnp    vcf1     none            known           1      3095693981  3399907       2.08            0.00         3399907                2.08             0.0   814506              0.00            814506               0.0   867           0.00            867
VariantSummary  dbsnp    vcf1     none            novel           1      3095693981    46259       1.71          100.00           46259                1.71             0.0   147522            100.00            147522               0.0  2415         100.00           2415

I didn't think that HaplotypeCaller even looked for structural variations, so I tried to find these structural variations in the VCF, hoping they were encoded as described here and I couldn't find anything. Could someone tell me why VariantEval is showing a number of structural variations but the actual VCF isn't finding any? Does VariantEval just interpret a sufficiently large indel as a SV? If so, I can understand why it may call some structural variations considering there are indels longer than 1k bp in the indels of the sample.

Thanks,

Grant