Blog

  • In the news: Times profiles Eric Lander

    Elizabeth Cooney, January 3rd, 2012

    Broad Director Eric Lander is profiled in today's New York Times as a leader in science who co-founded a biomedical institute although his field was at first pure mathematics.

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  • Revisiting our festive science images

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 27th, 2011 | Filed under

    Last year during the holiday season, we invited Broad researchers to submit scientific images with a seasonal flair. We thought it would be fun to revisit those images, resembling holiday lights, cracked ice, and tinsel. Enjoy this slideshow of festive imagery from the world of science as we count down to the new year!

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  • Yours and MINE

    Haley Bridger, December 16th, 2011

    David and Yakir Reshef can’t help but fill in each other’s sentences. As we talk about the project that they have been working on together for the past several years, the discussion easily shifts back and forth as one and then the other takes the lead in describing their work. Their conversation is so seamless that when I go back to review the tape of our interview, it’s tricky to figure out where Yakir’s quotes end and David’s begin. They have the sort of mental rapport unique to close siblings or co-authors.

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  • Human Microbiome Snapshot

    Alice McCarthy, December 9th, 2011

    The human microbiome is the community of organisms that live, either peacefully or in mortal combat, inside of our bodies or on our skin. Broad researchers and affiliate scientists have been studying the human microbiome with the goal of learning how it influences health or disease. A few of this year’s highlights:

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  • Behind the Scenes: Building the Broad’s cloud

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 8th, 2011 | Filed under

    Broadies are pros at sharing. They share ideas, data, equipment, and even bikes. So it may be no surprise to learn that behind the scenes of the Broad’s fast-paced research computing network for data collection and analysis, servers have been quietly getting in the sharing game, too, going “virtual” to save the Broad money, energy, and space and to keep pace with the growing demand for efficient computing by large and diverse research projects throughout the institute.

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  • Broad researcher receives GE-Science Prize

    Elizabeth Cooney, December 1st, 2011

    Ramen noodles. Origami. And a ridiculously good hammer. These are just some of the images Erez Lieberman Aiden uses to help us see the entire genome inside the human cell, territory he and others at the Broad charted in a feat combining molecular biology with three-dimensional genome sequencing. Their method zooms in on the cell nucleus to reveal just how the two-meter-long human genome folds itself inside a space several times narrower than a human hair.

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  • A slice of Satsuma

    Haley Bridger, November 29th, 2011

    Before arriving at a conference in Santa Cruz last year, Broad researcher Federica Di Palma had not realized that the computational tool developed by others at the Broad and relished by her research group had such a following outside of the institute. Federica and her fellow members of the Broad’s Vertebrate Biology Group had been among the first scientists to put the alignment tool – known as Satsuma – to use, but they were certainly not the only ones.

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  • A bounty of scientific inspiration at your Thanksgiving table

    Haley Bridger, November 22nd, 2011 | Filed under

    From the Archives: We've delved into the BroadMinded blog archives to bring you this post, which was originally published in November 2010.

    At the risk of catching a bad case of YAGS right before the holidays, I googled “turkey genome” this week to see what’s cooking in the world of poultry genomics. It turns out that scientists have already mapped about 90 percent of the turkey’s genome and are learning about genes that influence things like meat quality, disease susceptibility, and turkey reproduction and fertility. You can read more about the turkey genome project here.

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  • It’s what's on the menu that counts

    Alice McCarthy, November 16th, 2011

    Though it may not seem obvious, fungi are the sister group to animals on the tree of life. Unlike bacteria, which are an entirely different part of the tree of life, fungi are nestled in with eukaryotes close to humans and other animals. Because of that they share a lot of common biological pathways. To treat a fungal infection successfully, without eliciting undue harm to its human host, one needs to find out what makes them different from animals.

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  • How microbes “retweet” antibiotic resistance

    Haley Bridger, November 10th, 2011

    Just as researchers come together to share great ideas and new techniques, resourceful bacteria share their innovations, too. Eric Alm, an associate member of the Broad Institute and associate professor at MIT, was one of more than 30 speakers to share his work with the rest of the Broad community at the Broad Retreat, which took place on Monday and Tuesday. Eric reminded us that humans are largely outnumbered: for every human cell in our body, there are ten microbes living on and within us.

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