Blog

  • Visualizing a genome in disarray

    Leah Eisenstadt, May 16th, 2012

    Last week on the Broad website, we featured recent work by Broad researchers that can shed new light on the massive genomic changes taking place in cancer cells. The genomes in tumors are often drastically disorganized, with large chunks of missing or extra DNA — even whole chromosomes — in addition to smaller, single-letter mutations. These alterations can complicate the search for genetic changes underlying cancer.

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  • Expand your mind

    Ellen Clegg, May 15th, 2012 | Filed under

    The Broad Institute is launching a new series of workshops to share laboratory and computational methods developed within our community and extend the impact of our science. These BroadE workshops, which launch May 21, are open to all Broad staff and to scientists from the Harvard and MIT communities. 

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  • WormToolbox in action

    Alice McCarthy, May 10th, 2012

    Last week we wrote about the new WormToolbox automated imaging software, used to capture single images of the C. elegans roundworm. See the news story here.

    While it’s one thing to describe the technology, we thought we’d share several images from real Broad Institute experiments using the WormToolbox program.

     

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  • A Sage partnership

    Haley Bridger, April 12th, 2012

    Even when everything is in working order, the team in the Broad’s Genome Sequencing Platform is never completely satisfied. Someone is always tinkering, inventing, or thinking about a way to strengthen one of the links in the chain of events that leads to sequenced DNA.

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  • Broad artist in residence at MassArt

    Ellen Clegg, April 4th, 2012 | Filed under

    Look around the Broad's public spaces, and you'll find that the Broad is “Unfolding.” That’s the title of an exhibition featuring the work that artist-in-residence Guhapriya Ranganathan has created during her two-year collaboration with scientists here. Tonight, Ranganathan, known as Gupi, will give a talk at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston about that collaboration.

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  • Zooming in on early embryonic development

    Elizabeth Cooney, March 30th, 2012

    If there were just one book of biology, it would be rewritten constantly with the sometimes dramatic, more often incremental advances in understanding that come with the nature of science. Constant revision can come with insight – think Darwin – or with technology – witness faster, cheaper sequencing machines – or with both.

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  • 2000 common variations and counting

    Alice McCarthy, March 27th, 2012

    Over the past five years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified about 2,000 common genetic variations that underlie human disease risk. Earlier this week, we told you about a model Broad researchers and collaborators developed to help explain how thousands of other common genetic variations with low effect size combine to contribute to disease risk in rheumatoid arthritis and three other common diseases with a known genetic link.

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  • The opening moves of HIV

    Haley Bridger, March 9th, 2012

    Picture a game of chess between the immune system and HIV. For every move the immune system makes against the virus, its opponent adapts, changing the game and shifting the advantage. But what if you could turn the clock back and watch the first few moves of the game? What could you learn about the virus from its opening moves?

    Researchers from the Broad Institute and the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, MIT, and Harvard set out to take a careful look at a viral population during the critical time period just after infection.

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  • Eric Lander wins Dan David Prize

    Haley Bridger, March 2nd, 2012

    The Broad Institute’s Director Eric Lander is among the recipients of the 2012 Dan David Prize – a prestigious Israeli award for achievements having an outstanding scientific, technological, cultural or social impact.

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  • Making waves at Marco Island

    Elizabeth Cooney, February 24th, 2012

    It’s been a long time since Chad Nusbaum has seen a conference room go so quiet so fast.

    A speaker from Oxford Nanopore Technologies had just described the company’s new disposable device, which will sell for less than $900. The size of a USB memory stick, it reads individual chemical bases on a strand of DNA as it passes through a tiny hole, measuring differences in electrical conductivity to reveal their identity. A larger version of the device will stack in arrays that are projected to be able to sequence a human genome in 15 minutes.

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