Blog

  • In the news: WBUR talks with Broad scientists on “Brain Matters”

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 20th, 2014 | Filed under

    Steve Hyman, director of the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, was recently featured in WBUR’s special series “Brain Matters.” The series, which will run through July 24, aims to report “from the front lines of neuroscience,” and is exploring issues and trends in neurological and psychiatric research.

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  • In the news: Wall Street Journal op-ed balances a troublesome argument

    Leah Eisenstadt, June 13th, 2014

    The Wall Street Journal this weekend featured an opinion piece by Broad Institute deputy director David Altshuler and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the director of Harvard's Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. In the piece, Altshuler and Gates present a thoughtful perspective on the history of race as a concept, and the misguided tendency to “view race strictly through the lens of genetic inheritance”.

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  • Eric Lander, Gad Getz listed among “the one hundred”

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 4th, 2014

    For the past seven years, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center has celebrated the one hundred.” The annual fundraising event recognizes 100 individuals and organizations that are making a difference in the fight against cancer.

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  • Students Ask : Broadies Answer

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 3rd, 2014

    The Broad’s Office of Education and Outreach, in collaboration with the Cancer Program, is putting tools used for cancer research in students’ hands.

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  • Broad DREAM Challenge: Help find cancer’s vulnerabilities

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 2nd, 2014

    The Broad-DREAM Gene Essentiality Prediction Challenge has begun. Computational biologists and math wizards of all stripes are invited to enter the competition, which calls on statistically inclined members of the public to develop predictive computational models that reveal which genes are most essential to the survival of various cancer subtypes.

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  • Broad Paper Vids: From biopsy to bedside

    Paul Goldsmith, May 29th, 2014

    Whole-exome sequencing—a technique that decodes the genetic information in protein-coding genes—has transformed the understanding and analysis of cancer biology, but the impact of this revolutionary technique has yet to reach patients in the clinic.

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  • Now playing: Broad Paper Vids

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, May 23rd, 2014

    In the coming months, a new video series on the Broad’s popular YouTube channel will introduce viewers to published research – from the scientist’s perspective. In each installment of the “Broad Paper Vids” series, institute researchers will describe the exciting scientific discoveries that have made their way from the Broad to the pages of respected scientific journals.

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  • Broad core member awarded National Science Foundation’s highest honor

    Leah Eisenstadt, April 10th, 2014

    Broad Institute core faculty member Feng Zhang has been named the 2014 recipient of the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation. The award, named after the NSF’s first director, is the agency’s highest honor, which annually recognizes an outstanding researcher under the age of 35. Zhang’s award will help support his work to understand how the brain works.

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  • Glioblastoma’s “stem-like” cells laid bare

    Haley Bridger, April 10th, 2014

    What: Glioblastoma, the most common and most aggressive form of brain cancer in adults, remains effectively incurable. Evidence suggests that “stem-like” cells help drive this difficult-to-treat disease. These cells may possess properties that give them the ability to resist treatment and drive cancer’s growth, but pinpointing them and understanding the circuitry that makes them behave the way they do has been a major challenge.

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  • Studies converge on ALS

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, April 4th, 2014

    What: Researchers from the Broad Institute, the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) used an eclectic combination of cutting-edge technologies to determine what’s going wrong at the molecular level in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Their research, published online this week in two separate Cell journals, sheds light on the mechanisms that lead to the disease and highlights potential targets for new treatments.

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