Blog

  • Cancer close-up: Single-cell approach provides detailed look inside tumors

    Members of the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad Institute and the Joint Center for Cancer Precision Medicine (CCPM) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Broad have embarked on an ambitious effort to use single-cell genome analysis to explore

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  • From spectrum to continuum

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, March 17th, 2016

    New research uses genetic and behavioral data to shed light on autism-associated traits in the general population

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  • Machine learning approach improves CRISPR-Cas9 guide pairing

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, January 18th, 2016

    Some will say that finding just the right wine to pair with a meal can improve even the finest cuisine, transforming a pleasant gustatory experience into something approaching perfection. But with potentially hundreds of wines to choose from, picking the “right” one can be a chore for the casual wine-lover. That’s where the sommelier comes in, applying expertise to curate a list of only the best pairings to suit one’s needs.

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  • A single gene spawning multiple disorders: Guoping Feng on Shank3 in autism, schizophrenia

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, December 10th, 2015

    Over the last few years, genetic datasets for psychiatric disorders have grown and many have merged, thanks in large part to the collaborative efforts of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at Broad Institute, their partners at the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, and the tens of thousands of donors who have contributed biological samples with the hope of helping to combat these debilitating disorders.

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  • Single-cell analysis helps sort out host-pathogen interactions

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, September 10th, 2015

    What: When bacteria invade the human body, immune cells rush to our defense, initiating a high-stakes tug-of-war in which macrophages – a type of immune cell that engulfs and digests pathogens and cellular debris – attempt to destroy the invaders while the bacteria look to survive and replicate. The outcomes of these cellular death matches vary from cell to cell: some macrophages engulf bacteria while others remain uninfected, and of those infected, some destroy their invaders while others allow bacteria to thrive.

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  • From Barrett’s to cancer

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, July 20th, 2015

    What: A new study by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital suggests that esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) progresses differently than previously suspected.

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  • Five (more) questions for David Root

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 12th, 2015

    Four years ago, David Root talked with us about the fundamentals of RNA interference (RNAi) technology. But, since then, the group that Root oversees – Broad’s erstwhile RNAi Platform – has taken on a new identity: it’s now known as the Genetic Perturbation Platform (GPP).

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  • GTEx: Useful expression for cancer research

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, May 20th, 2015

    This month, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project, which set out five years ago to create a comprehensive atlas and open database of gene expression and gene regulation across human tissues, published several papers reporting on findings from its two-year pilot phase.

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  • Five Questions for Kristin Ardlie

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, May 7th, 2015

    The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project started five years ago with the goal of creating a comprehensive atlas and open database of gene expression and gene regulation across human tissues. This week, the researchers spearheading the NIH-funded effort released five papers reporting on the pilot phase of the project.

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  • Broad Summer Scholar wins prestigious Intel science prize

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, March 27th, 2015

    Each year, well over a thousand promising high school science students enter the Intel Science Talent Search, long considered the nation’s most prestigious science competition. When all is said and done, only three take home top honors and the accompanying $150,000 prize.

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