Blog

  • Sangeeta Bhatia awarded Lemelson-MIT Prize

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, September 8th, 2014

    Broad senior associate member Sangeeta Bhatia has been named the 2014 recipient of the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize. The honor, which is celebrating its 20th year, recognizes outstanding, mid-career inventors who are improving the world through technological invention, and demonstrating a commitment to mentorship in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Finding the mutations that matter

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, August 7th, 2014

    A major endeavor in genomics research, at the Broad Institute and beyond, is to identify the variations in the human genetic code that may be associated with disease. Such variations can point to potential drug targets or shed light on the biological mechanisms underlying a disease.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • In the news: WBUR talks with Broad scientists on “Brain Matters”

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 20th, 2014 | Filed under

    Steve Hyman, director of the Broad Institute’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, was recently featured in WBUR’s special series “Brain Matters.” The series, which will run through July 24, aims to report “from the front lines of neuroscience,” and is exploring issues and trends in neurological and psychiatric research.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Eric Lander, Gad Getz listed among “the one hundred”

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 4th, 2014

    For the past seven years, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center has celebrated the one hundred.” The annual fundraising event recognizes 100 individuals and organizations that are making a difference in the fight against cancer.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Students Ask : Broadies Answer

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 3rd, 2014

    The Broad’s Office of Education and Outreach, in collaboration with the Cancer Program, is putting tools used for cancer research in students’ hands.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Broad DREAM Challenge: Help find cancer’s vulnerabilities

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, June 2nd, 2014

    The Broad-DREAM Gene Essentiality Prediction Challenge has begun. Computational biologists and math wizards of all stripes are invited to enter the competition, which calls on statistically inclined members of the public to develop predictive computational models that reveal which genes are most essential to the survival of various cancer subtypes.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Now playing: Broad Paper Vids

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, May 23rd, 2014

    In the coming months, a new video series on the Broad’s popular YouTube channel will introduce viewers to published research – from the scientist’s perspective. In each installment of the “Broad Paper Vids” series, institute researchers will describe the exciting scientific discoveries that have made their way from the Broad to the pages of respected scientific journals.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Studies converge on ALS

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, April 4th, 2014

    What: Researchers from the Broad Institute, the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) used an eclectic combination of cutting-edge technologies to determine what’s going wrong at the molecular level in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Their research, published online this week in two separate Cell journals, sheds light on the mechanisms that lead to the disease and highlights potential targets for new treatments.

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Setting the standard in proteomics

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, February 27th, 2014

    What: Members of the Broad’s Proteomics Platform were the lead authors of a recent paper that outlined best practices for developing and publishing studies involving one of the field’s signature tools: targeted mass spectrometry (MS).

    0 Comments
    Read More
  • Ancestral legacy

    Veronica Meade-Kelly, January 29th, 2014

    It’s part of human nature: we look at ourselves in the mirror and see links to the past. “Those bright green eyes?” we think. “Those came from grandma.” “The cleft chin? That’s from dad’s side.” Our instinct, of course, is to attribute notable traits to close relatives – those that we know personally or through family history. The reality, however, is that the genetics that influence our traits – or “phenotypes” – could date back generations.

    0 Comments
    Read More