Blog

  • Broad Paper Vids: Metabolic changes signal early development of pancreatic cancer

    Paul Goldsmith, October 3rd, 2014

    Pancreatic cancer is the tenth most common cancer in the United States, but the fourth most common cause of cancer death. This disparity is due, in part, to the disease’s elusive nature. Because the pancreas is located deep in the abdomen, symptoms often present only after cancer has spread to other places in the body. But this week, a team of researchers from the Broad, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, MIT, and elsewhere reported the discovery of metabolic changes that indicate early development of the disease.

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  • The Rabbit Rift

    Paul Goldsmith, September 4th, 2014

    By all accounts, Pope Gregory I was quite the innovator. Along with his many liturgical accomplishments, he’s credited (somewhat apocryphally) with popularizing Gregorian chant, coining the phrase ‘bless you’ after someone sneezes, and perhaps, most unwittingly, creating one of the best experimental models for studying the evolution of domesticated animals. 

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  • Broad in the news: Ted Stanley’s extraordinary commitment to psychiatric research

    Paul Goldsmith, July 25th, 2014

    On Tuesday, July 22, the Broad Institute announced an unprecedented commitment of $650 million from philanthropist Ted Stanley to support psychiatric research. Stanley’s gift – the largest ever in psychiatric research and among the largest for scientific research in general – generated a great deal of coverage in the media.

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  • Broad Paper Vids: From biopsy to bedside

    Paul Goldsmith, May 29th, 2014

    Whole-exome sequencing—a technique that decodes the genetic information in protein-coding genes—has transformed the understanding and analysis of cancer biology, but the impact of this revolutionary technique has yet to reach patients in the clinic.

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  • Kerstin Lindblad-Toh receives major award from Swedish Research Council

    Paul Goldsmith, March 31st, 2014

    This week, Broad scientific director of vertebrate genome biology Kerstin Lindblad-Toh became one of the first recipients of a new long-term research grant from the Swedish Research Council. The program, known as Grants for Distinguished Professors, provides Swedish scientists with 10 years of flexible funding to support ambitious, long-term projects. Lindblad-Toh is one of only nine researchers selected to receive the inaugural award.

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  • Putting a neglected disease in the spotlight

    Paul Goldsmith, February 6th, 2014

    Heard of Chagas disease? Chances are, unless you live in Central or South America where the disease affects an estimated 8 million people, you probably haven’t.

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  • Broadies named to ‘30 under 30’

    Paul Goldsmith, January 10th, 2014

    The annual Forbes ’30 under 30’ was revealed this week, and two members of the Broad community, Cigall Kadoch and Aleksander Kostic, were named to the list. Now in its third year, ’30 under 30’ recognizes the brightest young talents in 15 different fields, including science and healthcare, technology and finance.

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  • Broad announces new Merkin Institute Fellows

    Paul Goldsmith, November 22nd, 2013

    The Broad Institute is pleased to announce the latest class of Merkin Institute Fellows. The Broad’s first endowed fellowship, the Merkin Institute Fellows program was established in 2012 by Dr. Richard Merkin to provides sustained support for some of the most promising and ambitious scientists pursuing bold research at the Broad. The 2013-2014 recipients represent three of the Broad’s fastest rising stars: Sangeeta Bhatia, John Doench, and Angela Koehler.

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  • Fighting cancer with some help from our (best) friends

    Paul Goldsmith, October 11th, 2013

    Sit. Fetch. Roll-over. Humans have been trying to teach dogs for tens of thousands of years. But when it comes to the genetics of cancer, it turns out dogs have a lot to teach us, as well.

    Different as we may seem, humans and dogs are genetically-speaking quite similar. Almost all canine genes have a matching gene in the human genome. Given this correlation, it’s no surprise that dogs suffer from many of the same genetic disorders as human, including cancer.

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  • TEDxCambridge: Decoding a Genomic Revolution

    Paul Goldsmith, October 2nd, 2013

    In his September 13, TEDxCambridge lecture, ‘Decoding a Genomic Revolution,’ Broad associate member and MIT associate professor Manolis Kellis used details from his own genome to demonstrate how science can bridge the gap between genetic variants and disease.

    Check out the video below and accompany Kellis on a journey into his personal genome to find out how recent discoveries could change the future of medical care.

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