Blog

  • A genome blooms

    Leah Eisenstadt, October 22nd, 2010 | Filed under

    The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew is a lovely place to explore, where visitors can stroll among the treetops nearly 60 feet above the ground, tunnel through an interactive play area shaped like a plant, or get a close-up view of piranha, poison-dart tree frogs, and baby water dragons.

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  • What is exome sequencing?

    Leah Eisenstadt, October 15th, 2010 | Filed under

    The human genome consists of 3 billion nucleotides or “letters” of DNA. But only a small percentage — 1.5 percent — of those letters are actually translated into proteins, the functional players in the body. The “exome” consists of all the genome’s exons, which are the coding portions of genes. The term exon was derived from “EXpressed regiON,” since these are the regions that get translated, or expressed as proteins, as opposed to the intron, or “INTRagenic regiON” which is not represented in the final protein.

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  • Highlights on height

    Leah Eisenstadt, October 8th, 2010 | Filed under

    Last week, Broad researchers and others in the GIANT (Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits) Consortium published work revealing 180 genomic regions influencing height, the most yet identified for a single trait or disease. It may come as no surprise that stature is leading the pack when it comes to traits yielding their genetic secrets. Height is one of the easiest traits to measure, and studies on other traits and diseases often record subjects’ height, providing ample data for scientists.

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  • Broad epigenetics research makes a big splash

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 29th, 2010 | Filed under

    According to some, epigenomics is the next frontier for genome researchers. Literally meaning “on top of” the genome, the epigenome refers to chemical tags that attach to DNA and the protein scaffold that supports it, together known as “chromatin.” Those tags help turn genes on and off, and therefore they can have huge biological implications.

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  • Five Questions for Bang Wong

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 21st, 2010 | Filed under

    As Creative Director at the Broad, Bang Wong has helped shape the DNAtrium’s varied exhibits, created figures and cover art for many scientific papers, and collaborated with scientists on the best way to display complex data.

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