Blog

  • How tweet it is

    Leah Eisenstadt, April 28th, 2011 | Filed under

    With nearly 125 posts to date on the Broad blog, we are now venturing out into another realm of social media: Twitter. On the Broad’s new Twitter page, you can follow news updates, press releases, blog posts, and other announcements all in one place.

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  • Broad researchers bring rare variants to light with new technique

    Leah Eisenstadt, March 9th, 2011 | Filed under

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful at discovering common genetic variants that are risk factors for disease or that influence traits. Although more than 1,000 genetic loci, or regions of the genome, have been associated with diseases or traits through GWAS, much of the heritability remains hidden. A disease or trait’s heritability is the degree to which it is inherited, and therefore, influenced by genetic elements; scientists often determine heritability through studies of siblings and twins to tease out genetic and environmental effects.

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  • Neandertal paper wins big

    Leah Eisenstadt, February 22nd, 2011 | Filed under

    In May 2010, a team of scientists including several Broad researchers announced they had completed a draft of the genome sequence of the Neandertal, our closest evolutionary cousin. The study, appearing in the journal Science, was big news among genomic scientists and anthropologists.

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  • Power in numbers

    Leah Eisenstadt, February 16th, 2011 | Filed under

    Earlier this month, we reported on a powerful analysis of next-generation sequencing data from the pilot phase of the 1000 Genomes Project that resulted in a rich, high-resolution map of structural variation — extra, missing, or rearranged DNA — in the human genome. That map, along with research tools created from it, will enable new studies of this kind of DNA variation in human biology and disease.

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  • Lots of variation uncovered, but more remains hidden

    Leah Eisenstadt, February 7th, 2011 | Filed under

    As data from the Human Genome Project accumulated, scientists realized that there was a significant amount of variation in the human genome, especially in the form of single-letter changes known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The study of SNPs in the human genome and their influence on disease has been a major focus of genome research over the past decade and has revealed hundreds of SNPs associated with common diseases.

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  • Mentoring is in full swing at the Broad

    Leah Eisenstadt, January 27th, 2011 | Filed under

    January is National Mentoring Month, so it’s a nice time to reflect on our mentoring experiences. Many in the Broad community have at one time served as a mentor, a mentee, or both. Mentors at the Broad can be found at all levels, from research technicians up to core faculty members. The mentoring relationship is an essential one on the path to becoming a scientist, as many who enter the field are first inspired by a scientist or teacher they view as a role model.

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 5: Liver cells, in color

    Leah Eisenstadt, January 5th, 2011 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We posted a few at the end of 2010, and here's one more!

    This stunning picture is a false-colored microscopic image of human liver cells grown with mouse fibroblasts in vitro. The cellular model is useful for identifying changes in liver cells when treated with drugs. In this image, a blue stain marks the liver cell DNA, and green stains the cells' endoplasmic reticulum.

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  • Was that a typo?

    Leah Eisenstadt, January 4th, 2011 | Filed under

    Last month, we announced results from an international study of DNA from an exceptionally well-preserved finger bone found in Denisova Cave in southern Siberia. The work, led by scientists at Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology with contributions from several Broad researchers, provides evidence that a previously unknown class of human — dubbed the Denisovans — walked the earth at least 30,000 years ago alongside modern humans, Neandertals, and the “hobbit” of Flores.

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 4: Triangular cells

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 29th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

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  • The Broad's festive science images, part 3: Chemical screening data

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 28th, 2010 | Filed under

    Here at the BroadMinded Blog, we polled the Broad community for their best holiday-themed scientific imagery — and we got some wonderful responses. We'll be taking a break until the new year, but in the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous biological images sure to keep you in the holiday spirit. Check back each day for a new entry. See you in 2011!

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