Blog

  • A new phase for the microbiome

    Leah Eisenstadt, November 6th, 2013

    For the last five years, scientists at the Broad Institute have been helping generate a catalog of the trillions of microorganisms living on – and in – the human body. We now know that these passengers, collectively known as the microbiome, are not merely cargo; they have physiologic effects, both positive and detrimental, on their human hosts.

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  • Editing the epigenome

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 10th, 2013

    What: In continued work of the ENCODE project, which is aimed at uncovering the functional landscape of the human genome, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute’s Epigenomics Program and the Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a method to test the functions of genomic elements.

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  • Better living through proteomics

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 4th, 2013

    As a patient facing illness, knowing what’s ailing you can bring peace of mind and, more importantly, can inform treatment decisions. For neglected infectious diseases, accurate diagnostic tools can be revolutionary, saving lives and shaping the health of entire communities.

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  • Five Questions for Sangeeta Bhatia

    Leah Eisenstadt, August 15th, 2013 | Filed under

    For Sangeeta Bhatia, now is an exciting time to be a biomedical engineer. Her research on liver regeneration and nanomedicine spans the diverse and quickly advancing fields of nanotechnology, regenerative medicine, infectious disease, cancer, and tissue engineering, among others.

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  • Striking gold with scientific illustrations

    Leah Eisenstadt, July 30th, 2013

    Broad scientists publish hundreds of research papers every year. Some of those papers are among the most noteworthy in that journal issue, and may even be chosen as the issue’s “cover story” with accompanying artwork on the journal’s cover — an honor for scientists and artists alike.

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  • Creature Feature: African eye worm (Loa loa)

    Leah Eisenstadt, April 25th, 2013 | Filed under

    The human microbiome project revealed the vast numbers and types of microbes that live on and in the human body. While this thought may be unpleasant, humans can have larger, more gruesome passengers hitching a ride, such as the several-centimeter-long nematode Loa loa, which infects millions of people in Western and Central Africa.

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  • David Altshuler elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Leah Eisenstadt, April 24th, 2013

    Join us in congratulating David Altshuler, chief academic officer and deputy director of the Broad Institute, on his election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As a member, he joins some of the world’s most accomplished leaders from academia, business, public affairs, the humanities, and the arts, including Broad director Eric Lander and institute founder Eli Broad.

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  • Broad awarded top honor again

    Leah Eisenstadt, November 7th, 2012

    For the third straight year, the Broad Institute has been selected by the Boston Globe as one of the “Top Places to Work” in Massachusetts. This honor is an amazing tribute to the entire Broad community and its collaborative spirit.

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  • Faster, cheaper, smaller

    Leah Eisenstadt, June 26th, 2012 | Filed under

    A team of researchers at the Broad Institute recently revealed a new cell microarray capable of probing the functions of genes faster and cheaper than ever before.

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  • Visualizing a genome in disarray

    Leah Eisenstadt, May 16th, 2012

    Last week on the Broad website, we featured recent work by Broad researchers that can shed new light on the massive genomic changes taking place in cancer cells. The genomes in tumors are often drastically disorganized, with large chunks of missing or extra DNA — even whole chromosomes — in addition to smaller, single-letter mutations. These alterations can complicate the search for genetic changes underlying cancer.

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