Blog

  • Broad Paper Vids: Peering into the transcriptome of single cells

    Leah Eisenstadt, July 3rd, 2014

    The ability to monitor the function and activity of single cells in isolation using RNA sequencing enables researchers to uncover the remarkable heterogeneity of tissues. Using a new microfluidic system to prepare cells for single-cell RNA sequencing, a team of scientists at the Broad Institute and Fluidigm, led by Broad core member Aviv Regev, associate member Hongkun Park, and Fluidigm scientist Andrew May, analyzed the transcriptomes of more than 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells.

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  • Broad Paper Vids: Study of both common and rare variation yields insight into cardiac arrhythmia

    Leah Eisenstadt, June 24th, 2014

    In the search for genetic sources of disease risk or genes that control traits, scientists can look for a single mutant gene that causes a rare, Mendelian disease or common DNA alterations that influence the trait in the broader population. But often those approaches remain separate.

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  • In the news: Wall Street Journal op-ed balances a troublesome argument

    Leah Eisenstadt, June 13th, 2014

    The Wall Street Journal this weekend featured an opinion piece by Broad Institute deputy director David Altshuler and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the director of Harvard's Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. In the piece, Altshuler and Gates present a thoughtful perspective on the history of race as a concept, and the misguided tendency to “view race strictly through the lens of genetic inheritance”.

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  • Broad core member awarded National Science Foundation’s highest honor

    Leah Eisenstadt, April 11th, 2014

    Broad Institute core faculty member Feng Zhang has been named the 2014 recipient of the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation. The award, named after the NSF’s first director, is the agency’s highest honor, which annually recognizes an outstanding researcher under the age of 35. Zhang’s award will help support his work to understand how the brain works.

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  • Single driver mutation found in rare brain tumor

    Leah Eisenstadt, January 30th, 2014

    For patients with a rare brain tumor known as craniopharyngioma, the treatment options are slim — and often hazardous. Although the tumor is usually not aggressive, its location is perilous. Growing at the base of the skull near the pituitary gland, the tumor compresses parts of the brain as it enlarges, causing vision and learning problems and endocrine dysfunction, as well as morbid obesity. There is currently no drug to shrink the tumor, so the only options are surgical removal and radiation, which can leave patients with serious, lasting problems.

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  • Charting the RNA epigenome

    Leah Eisenstadt, December 13th, 2013

    In science, sometimes you need to dive deep to see the big picture. Scientists at the Broad Institute have demonstrated this time and again, enabling biological discoveries by generating dense maps, such as the survey of thousands of epigenetic marks on DNA across the human genome conducted as part of the ENCODE project.

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  • A new phase for the microbiome

    Leah Eisenstadt, November 6th, 2013

    For the last five years, scientists at the Broad Institute have been helping generate a catalog of the trillions of microorganisms living on – and in – the human body. We now know that these passengers, collectively known as the microbiome, are not merely cargo; they have physiologic effects, both positive and detrimental, on their human hosts.

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  • Editing the epigenome

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 10th, 2013

    What: In continued work of the ENCODE project, which is aimed at uncovering the functional landscape of the human genome, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute’s Epigenomics Program and the Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a method to test the functions of genomic elements.

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  • Better living through proteomics

    Leah Eisenstadt, September 4th, 2013

    As a patient facing illness, knowing what’s ailing you can bring peace of mind and, more importantly, can inform treatment decisions. For neglected infectious diseases, accurate diagnostic tools can be revolutionary, saving lives and shaping the health of entire communities.

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  • Five Questions for Sangeeta Bhatia

    Leah Eisenstadt, August 15th, 2013 | Filed under

    For Sangeeta Bhatia, now is an exciting time to be a biomedical engineer. Her research on liver regeneration and nanomedicine spans the diverse and quickly advancing fields of nanotechnology, regenerative medicine, infectious disease, cancer, and tissue engineering, among others.

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