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  • Pages from the first human genome

    Anne Buboltz, October 18th, 2010 | Filed under

    Six years ago this week, hundreds of researchers were awaiting the publication of their landmark study that focused on one thing ⎯ the human genome. In their study, the researchers described the complete sequence of human DNA, the order in which 3 billion genetics bases, or letters, appear along a strand of DNA.

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  • Robert Edwards honored as a Nobel laureate

    Anne Buboltz, October 4th, 2010 | Filed under

    Today, Robert G. Edwards, a British physiologist who spent much of his career at Cambridge University, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for developing in vitro fertilization (IVF), a technique used to help people conceive children. The procedure involves mixing eggs and sperm in a laboratory dish, and then returning the embryo to the womb to resume development.

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  • Info-Foto

    Anne Buboltz, July 23rd, 2010 | Filed under

    The Broad Institute is home to the DNAtrium, a museum of interactive exhibits showcasing the fascinating world of genomic research, new scientific instruments and the researchers who are driving forward progress in biology and medicine.

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  • A Midsummer Night at the Broad

    Anne Buboltz, July 22nd, 2010 | Filed under

    The focus of last night’s Midsummer Nights' Science Lecture at the Broad lecture was diabetes –a disease that affects more than 171 million people worldwide. Bridget Wagner, a group leader in pancreatic biology and metabolic disease in the Chemical Biology Program at the Broad Institute, spoke about the past and present of diabetes, as well as her group’s progress towards identifying small molecules that may someday be used to control diabetes.

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  • Capturing Fish Faster

    Anne Buboltz, July 19th, 2010 | Filed under

    The zebrafish has emerged as one of the most commonly used organisms in scientific research. They are genetically malleable, have transparent embryonic bodies, develop rapidly and are the most complex vertebrate that can be used for large-scale screening –a combination that makes zebrafish a relatively easy-to-screen model for human disease. Recent research has upgraded the zebrafish model’s status to really-fast-and-easy-to-screen.

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  • Dixcd1 ‘Broad-ens’ Neural Development

    Anne Buboltz, July 14th, 2010 | Filed under

    While the rate of major psychiatric diseases, such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and major depression, affect approximately 3 percent of the human population, one particularly unlucky Scottish family was plagued with a 27 percent rate of occurrence. One family’s burden became a scientist’s treasure, as researchers had an unparalleled opportunity to identify underlying genetic causes of psychiatric disease.

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  • ISMB Meeting: David Altshuler

    Anne Buboltz, July 13th, 2010 | Filed under

    The 18th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) ended today, wrapping up three days of lectures and posters presented by some of the world’s finest computational and molecular biologists, mathematicians, computer scientists and statisticians.  

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  • A Midsummer Night at the Broad

    Anne Buboltz, July 8th, 2010 | Filed under

    Bruce Birren, Director of the Microbial Sequence Center and co-Director of the Genome Sequencing and Analysis Program, kicked off the Broad Institute’s 5th Annual Midsummer Nights' Science series.  During his talk, entitled “Meet your Microbes,” Birren explained the research and goals of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) to an audience of peers, public visitors and inquisitive children.

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