Descriptions

Outline

Click the species name for a description of the organism

Microsporum gypseum CBS 118893

Microsporum gypseum is a geophile (soil dwelling) found throughout the world in soil. In humans, it causes fungal skin infections of the head and torso. It is mating competent.

Microsporum canis CBS 113480

Microsporum canis is the most commonly encountered zoophile in human infection. It is the most common cause of tinea capitis (fungal head infections) in Europe. M. canis is also a problem in pets, including dogs and cats, where it causes ringworm. M. canis is mating competent.

Trichophyton equinum CBS127.97

Trichophyton equinum is a zoophilic human pathogen and a significant cause of ringworm in horses, with an impact in horse breeding. Like T. tonsurans, there is no known mating in this species.

Trichophyton rubrum CBS118892

T. rubrum is quantitatively the most common Dermatophyte species causing infections. T. rubrum is an anthropophile (human specific) and is not capable of mating. This fungus is the most frequent cause of fungal skin infections in humans and is found throughout the world. At one Canadian national center, 58% of the Dermatophyte species isolated were T. rubrum. Once an infection with T. rubrum has been controlled by therapy, it appears that the patient is a life-long carrier.

Trichophyton tonsurans CBS112818

T. tonsurans is an anthropophile without mating ability. It is endemic in North America and the most common cause of scalp infections in children residing in the U.S., Canada and the Latin American countries.

Arthroderma benhamiae CBS 112371

The Arthroderma benhamiae genome was sequenced by a consortium led by the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knoell Institute (HKI) - in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Institute of Microbiology and Department of Dermatology and Allergology). More details about the Arthroderma benhamiae genome project can be found here.

Trichophyton verrucosum HKI 0517

The Trichophyton verrucosum HKI 0517 genome was sequenced by a consortium led by the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knoell Institute (HKI) - in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI), and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Institute of Microbiology and Department of Dermatology and Allergology).